extrinsic


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ex·trin·sic

 (ĭk-strĭn′sĭk, -zĭk)
adj.
1. Not forming an essential or inherent part of a thing; extraneous.
2. Originating from the outside; external.

[Latin extrīnsecus, from outside : exter, outside; see exterior + -im, adv. suff. + secus, alongside; see sekw- in Indo-European roots.]

ex·trin′si·cal·ly adv.

extrinsic

(ɛkˈstrɪnsɪk)
adj
1. not contained or included within; extraneous
2. originating or acting from outside; external
[C16: from Late Latin extrinsecus (adj) outward, from Latin (adv) from without, on the outward side, from exter outward + secus alongside, related to sequī to follow]
exˈtrinsically adv

ex•trin•sic

(ɪkˈstrɪn sɪk, -zɪk)

adj.
1. not essential or inherent; extraneous: extrinsic facts.
2. being, operating, or coming from without: extrinsic influences.
3. (of a muscle or nerve) originating outside the anatomical limits of a part.
[1535–45; < Late Latin extrinsicus, adj. use of Latin extrinsecus (adv.) on the outside]
ex•trin′si•cal•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.extrinsic - not forming an essential part of a thing or arising or originating from the outside; "extrinsic evidence"; "an extrinsic feature of the new building"; "that style is something extrinsic to the subject"; "looking for extrinsic aid"
inessential, unessential - not basic or fundamental
intrinsic, intrinsical - belonging to a thing by its very nature; "form was treated as something intrinsic, as the very essence of the thing"- John Dewey

extrinsic

adjective external, outside, exterior, foreign, imported, superficial, extraneous the extrinsic conditions which affect relationships

extrinsic

adjective
Not part of the essential nature of a thing:
Translations
extrinsisch
ekstrinsičanizvanjski

extrinsic

[eksˈtrɪnsɪk] ADJextrínseco

extrinsic

[ɪkˈstrɪnzɪk] adj (= external) [reasons, forces, factors] → extrinsèque

extrinsic

adjäußerlich; factor, reasonäußere(r, s); considerationsnicht hereinspielend

ex·trin·sic

a. extrínseco-a
___ musclemúsculo ___.
References in classic literature ?
Class difference was the only difference, and class was extrinsic. It could be shaken off.
Henson's scheme (which at first was considered very feasible even by men of science,) was founded upon the principle of an inclined plane, started from an eminence by an extrinsic force, applied and continued by the revolution of impinging vanes, in form and number resembling the vanes of a windmill.
"No, Bunny, it's principally in the shape of archaic ornaments, whose value, I admit, is largely extrinsic. But gold is gold, from Phoenicia to Klondike, and if we cleared the room we should eventually do very well."
The CA however denied their petition for failure to show that the RTC lacked jurisdiction due to lack of personal notice to them and that there is extrinsic fraud.
It is influenced by external as well as internal factors, which are known as extrinsic and intrinsic motivations respectively.
Mendez invoked anew 'extrinsic fraud' in seeking reconsideration of the CA's ruling.
These tools not only separate us from the animal world, but also help us to distinguish between reality and illusion, to transfer the clock into a compass, and to align our lives with extrinsic realities that govern the quality of life.
Motivation can be broken down into two general categories intrinsic and extrinsic. Recognizing which one better fuels you will help you customize your goals so you have a better chance of staying motivated and reaching that "finish line."
In order to determine the cause of teeth staining, it's important to understand extrinsic and intrinsic staining.
In the alternative, he argues that extrinsic evidence shows that Patsy intended to include Mickey as a beneficiary of the Trust.
Things that motivate us broadly fall into two categories: extrinsic (or external) factors, such as other people and events, and intrinsic (or internal) factors such as our values and desire to learn new skills.
"Then there is transcendent motivation -- a kind of motivation that is often excluded in the traditional dualistic distinction between extrinsic and intrinsic motivation."