extrinsic


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ex·trin·sic

 (ĭk-strĭn′sĭk, -zĭk)
adj.
1. Not forming an essential or inherent part of a thing; extraneous.
2. Originating from the outside; external.

[Latin extrīnsecus, from outside : exter, outside; see exterior + -im, adv. suff. + secus, alongside; see sekw- in Indo-European roots.]

ex·trin′si·cal·ly adv.

extrinsic

(ɛkˈstrɪnsɪk)
adj
1. not contained or included within; extraneous
2. originating or acting from outside; external
[C16: from Late Latin extrinsecus (adj) outward, from Latin (adv) from without, on the outward side, from exter outward + secus alongside, related to sequī to follow]
exˈtrinsically adv

ex•trin•sic

(ɪkˈstrɪn sɪk, -zɪk)

adj.
1. not essential or inherent; extraneous: extrinsic facts.
2. being, operating, or coming from without: extrinsic influences.
3. (of a muscle or nerve) originating outside the anatomical limits of a part.
[1535–45; < Late Latin extrinsicus, adj. use of Latin extrinsecus (adv.) on the outside]
ex•trin′si•cal•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.extrinsic - not forming an essential part of a thing or arising or originating from the outside; "extrinsic evidence"; "an extrinsic feature of the new building"; "that style is something extrinsic to the subject"; "looking for extrinsic aid"
inessential, unessential - not basic or fundamental
intrinsic, intrinsical - belonging to a thing by its very nature; "form was treated as something intrinsic, as the very essence of the thing"- John Dewey

extrinsic

adjective external, outside, exterior, foreign, imported, superficial, extraneous the extrinsic conditions which affect relationships

extrinsic

adjective
Not part of the essential nature of a thing:
Translations
extrinsisch
ekstrinsičanizvanjski

extrinsic

[eksˈtrɪnsɪk] ADJextrínseco

extrinsic

[ɪkˈstrɪnzɪk] adj (= external) [reasons, forces, factors] → extrinsèque

extrinsic

adjäußerlich; factor, reasonäußere(r, s); considerationsnicht hereinspielend

ex·trin·sic

a. extrínseco-a
___ musclemúsculo ___.
References in classic literature ?
Class difference was the only difference, and class was extrinsic.
Henson's scheme (which at first was considered very feasible even by men of science,) was founded upon the principle of an inclined plane, started from an eminence by an extrinsic force, applied and continued by the revolution of impinging vanes, in form and number resembling the vanes of a windmill.
No, Bunny, it's principally in the shape of archaic ornaments, whose value, I admit, is largely extrinsic.
In turn, extrinsic motivators (or rewards) can be divided into artificial motivators with direct costs and or natural motivators (without direct costs):
According to this theory, academic motivation is classified into intrinsic motivation (stimuli resulted from personal needs and satisfaction), extrinsic motivation (stimuli from environment and commitment) and amotivation based on the effects of needs, intrinsic stimuli and their interaction with extrinsic stimuli [5].
Performance of employees in the public sphere (Koplyay, Lloyd, and Mako, 2014) depends much more on intrinsic incentives than on extrinsic motivations.
As the first contribution, this paper treats Job Satisfaction as two components, Intrinsic and Extrinsic Satisfaction to identify the relative importance of both in the development of Turnover Intention.
14] Elbow contractures can be classified as extrinsic or intrinsic according to the underlying aetiology.
On appeal, Biers claims that the district court abused its discretion by excluding extrinsic evidence of Clines retaliatory intent and that the district court erred in finding that no reasonable juror could find retaliation.
Extrinsic life aspirations, which are generally viewed as a means to get contingent external approval or rewards (e.
2e](t) are the extrinsic information generated by the decoders.
In this study, the ac academic performance of the students in relation to their intrinsic and extrinsic motivation is explored.