extrovert

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ex·tro·vert

also ex·tra·vert  (ĕk′strə-vûrt′)
n.
An extroverted person.

[Alteration (influenced by introvert) of extravert : extra- + Latin vertere, vers-, to turn; see wer- in Indo-European roots.]

extrovert

(ˈɛkstrəˌvɜːt) psychol or

extravert

n
(Psychology) a person concerned more with external reality than inner feelings
adj
(Psychology) of or characterized by extroversion: extrovert tendencies.
[C20: from extro- (variant of extra-, contrasting with intro-) + -vert, from Latin vertere to turn]
ˈextroˌverted, ˈextraˌverted adj

ex•tro•vert

(ˈɛk strəˌvɜrt)

n.
1. an outgoing person; a person concerned primarily with the physical and social environment rather than with the self.
adj.
2. Also, ex′tro•vert`ed. marked by extroversion; outgoing.
[1918; German extravertiert]

extrovert

A person whose interests are directed outwardly rather than inwardly.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.extrovert - (psychology) a person concerned more with practical realities than with inner thoughts and feelings
individual, mortal, person, somebody, someone, soul - a human being; "there was too much for one person to do"
psychological science, psychology - the science of mental life
introvert - (psychology) a person who tends to shrink from social contacts and to become preoccupied with their own thoughts
Adj.1.extrovert - being concerned with the social and physical environment
extraversive, extroversive - directed outward; marked by interest in others or concerned with external reality

extrovert

adjective extroverted
noun
1. outgoing person, mingler, socializer, mixer, life and soul of the party He was a showman, an extrovert who revelled in controversy.
outgoing person introvert
Translations
مُنْبَسِط، إنْبِساطي
åbenudadvendt
extrovertáltextrovertált emberkifelé forduló
úthverfur maîur
ekstravertasekstravertiškas
ekstraverts, uz ārpasauli vērsts
extrovert

extrovert

[ˈekstrəʊvɜːrt]
A. ADJextrovertido
B. Nextrovertido/a m/f

extrovert

[ˈɛkstrəvɜːrt]
adj [personality] → extraverti(e)
n (= person) → extraverti(e) m/f

extrovert

extrovert

[ˈɛkstrəʊvɜːt] adj & nestroverso/a

extrovert

(ˈekstrəvəːt) noun, adjective
(a person) more interested in what happens around him than his own ideas and feelings. An extrovert (person) is usually good company.

ex·tro·vert

, extravert
a. extrovertido-a, tipo de personalidad que dirige la atención a sucesos u objetos fuera de sí mismo-a.

extrovert

n extrovertido -da mf
References in periodicals archive ?
But this column cannot bow to censorship so let me tell you how the caption should have read: "Wannabe extroverts waiting to audition for Big Brother III at Channel 4 studios are forced to watch the raw feed of Charles Kennedy's keynote speech on tax plans."
She's is part of a new exhibition called Improperganda which shows off the attention-grabbing antics of Satanica as she's known, extroverts and shameless exibitionists.
According to the study, if companies are looking for extroverts, such as those hiring for sales or marketing positions, may be doing themselves an even worse disservice as extroverts were significantly more likely to post about drugs or alcohol on Facebook.
Luton University psychology lecturer Dr Tony Fallone, who did the survey, said: "Blondes are lively extroverts. But men are more likely to dismiss them as dumb bimbos."
New York, June 18 ( ANI ): Extroverts' brains process rewarding experiences differently than introverts, a new study has found.
Before she leaves she'll star on next Monday's STV Scottish Women show about extroverts.
Washington, April 11 ( ANI ): It is often assumed that extroverts make the best salespeople?
On the other hand a quarter of British men view themselves as fun-loving extroverts and eleven per cent even insist they make themselves laugh more than anyone else.
The key difference lies in what energizes introverts and extroverts, says Chrissy Romano, a fourth-grade teacher in New Jersey and author of Quiet Kids Count: Unleashing the True Potential of Introverts (Times 10 Publications, 2019).
[USA], May 30 (ANI): Researchers have zeroed down four key advantages that extroverts enjoy in the workplace.
class="MsoNormalThere will be situations when you may feel less confident - this happens to all of us, even the extroverts, though they tend to struggle with over-confidence.
The study, conducted by linguists at the University of Michigan, found that introverts were more likely to be annoyed by typos and grammatical mistakes than extroverts. And, interestingly, we don't want to live with the people who commit these errors, either.