eye dialect


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eye dialect

n.
The use of nonstandard spellings, such as enuff for enough or wuz for was, to indicate that the speaker is uneducated or using colloquial, dialectal, or nonstandard speech.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

eye′ di`alect


n.
the literary use of misspellings that are intended to convey a speaker's lack of education or use of dialectal pronunciations but that are actually respellings of standard pronunciations, as wimmin for “women” or wuz for “was.”
[1920–25]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.eye dialect - the use of misspellings to identify a colloquial or uneducated speaker
dialect, idiom, accent - the usage or vocabulary that is characteristic of a specific group of people; "the immigrants spoke an odd dialect of English"; "he has a strong German accent"; "it has been said that a language is a dialect with an army and navy"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Wolfe achieves this through his use of eye dialect, a writing technique used to "twist standard orthography to suggest nonstandard pronunciations" (Walpole 192).
Like "eye dialect and interlingual punning" in Cahan and Henry Roth, which are "products of a discordance between speech and writing" (p.
The first two help the author discuss some of the conventions commonly used to portray dialect in literature, trying to balance the desire for accuracy with transparency and accessibility: eye dialect, semi-phonetic spellings, allegro-speech spellings -an', 'cos or gonna- regionalisms, colloquialisms, etc.
Linguists call this "eye dialect," or phonetic (mis)spellings signalling "difference," but not necessarily enhancing "realism."(11) Holton suggests that the employment of eye dialect also signals an author's "patronizing" attitude toward a character; to go further, the use of eye dialect to represent Black English could be construed, in certain circumstances, as racist.