eyeshine


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eye·shine

 (ī′shīn′)
n.
The glow reflected from the eyes of some animals when struck by light in dark surroundings.

eyeshine

(ˈaɪˌʃaɪn)
n
(Zoology) the reflection of light from an animal's eye at night
References in periodicals archive ?
We'd been illuminating the grassy roadsides of South Dakota's Wind Cave National Park for two hours, searching for the telltale green eyeshine of a ferret, but nothing had turned up.
At the same time, we believe that the use of reflectors did not alter the sightability of marked individuals after capture: typically, during spotlight counts, deer were first detected thanks to the eyeshine effect of the tapetum lucidum, while the presence of reflectors was detected only at a later point in time (normally a few seconds).
The other Listed race on the card, 32Red EBF Stallions River Eden Fillies' Stakes, could be owned by Eyeshine.
As potential predators on pheasant and grouse moors wildcats are killed 'incidentally' by indiscriminate methods of predator control such as snares and 'lamping', a method of hunting at night using bright lights to detect eyeshine (Macdonald et al., 2004, 2010).
* Tapetum lucidum: The iridescent, light-reflecting layer of tissue behind the retina reflects light known as "eyeshine." It enhances night vision and is responsible for dogs' eyes' glowing in the dark or a camera's flash.
* Tapetum lucidum: The iridescent, light-reflecting layer of tissue behind the retina reflects light (known as "eyeshine") and enhances night vision.
Exhibits were broken down into several topics: "Sensational Senses," "Bioluminescence," "Eyeshine," the "Night Gallery" wildlife diorama, and "Your Backyard?"
Strikingly pallid in color, the animals forage high in the forest canopy, freeze in the spotlight and have a stunningly bright eyeshine. While the southern possum--the white possum's close cousin--ventures down some 2,000 feet, the northern variety is confined to the coolest, wettest forests near the summit of Mount Lewis.
Seeing a cat with eyeshine is creepy enough, but after seeing it in a spider, it took me exactly .00001 seconds to decide that it had to die.
Most prosimians have a moist pointed snout and special eyes that reflect light--giving so-called eyeshine to those that are active at night.
Most spiders were collected at night by using headlamps to produce eyeshine; a few were collected by turning rocks during the day.