eyestone


Also found in: Medical.

eyestone

(ˈaɪˌstəʊn)
n
1. (Medicine) med a small lens-shaped device for removing foreign substances from the eye
2. (Minerals) mineralogy a type of agate with concentric markings
References in periodicals archive ?
[31] PARRISH, J; SUSKO-PARRISH, J; LEIBFRIED-RUTLEDGE, M; CRITSER, F; EYESTONE, W; FIRST, N.
(125) That same year Neal First, Randal Prather, and Willard Eyestone of the University of Wisconsin were able to successfully clone a cow from an embryonic cell further substantiating the authenticity of Willadsen's technique.
Internal indicators can include: population (Mintron and Sandra 1998, Eyestone 1977, Strang and Tuma 1993, Bouche' and Volden 2011); federal spending (Welch and Thompson 1980); economic wealth (income) and development (Boehmke and Witmer 2004, Berry and Berry 1990, Mooney 2001, Berry and Berry 1992, Bouche' and Volden 2011); size of the respective retail sector (Fishback, Horrace and Kantor 2005); and a measure of ideology, such as the vote composition of the electorate (Mooney 2001).
Eyestone; two step-children, Laura Irving McCarthy and George Stanley Irving.
The second important driving force comes from policy entrepreneurs, who are individuals active and influential in the process of policy making (Eyestone, 1978; Kingdon, 1984; Polsby, 1984; Price, 1971; Walker, 1974).
Elected first vice chair was Dennis Pierce of CommunityAmerica Credit Union, Kansas City, and elected second vice chair was Brian Eyestone of Southpointe CU, St.
John Eyestone of Upper Sandusky designed, built and used what he calls "the first documented 4-row self-propelled picker/sheller." He used an Army surplus 6-by-6 amphibious vehicle dating to World War II with a 4-71 Detroit diesel engine.