eyre

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eyre

 (âr)
n.
A circuit court held by itinerant royal justices in medieval England.

[Middle English, from Anglo-Norman eire, from Latin iter, journey; see ei- in Indo-European roots.]

eyre

(ɛə)
n
1. (Law) any of the circuit courts held in each shire from 1176 until the late 13th century
2. (Law) justices in eyre the justices travelling on circuit and presiding over such courts
[C13: from Old French erre journey, from errer to travel, from Latin errāre to wander]

Eyre

(ɛə)
n
(Placename) Lake Eyre a shallow salt lake or salt flat in NE central South Australia, about 11 m (35 ft) below sea level, divided into two areas (North and South); it usually contains little or no water. Maximum area: 9600 sq km (3700 sq miles)
[C19: named after Edward John Eyre (1815–1901), British explorer and colonial administrator]

Eyre

(ɛə)
n
1. (Biography) Edward John. 1815–1901, British explorer and colonial administrator. He was governor of Jamaica (1864–66) until his authorization of 400 executions to suppress an uprising led to his recall
2. (Biography) Sir Richard. born 1943, British theatre director: director of the Royal National Theatre (1988–97)

eyre

(ɛər)

n.
1. a circuit made by an itinerant judge in medieval England.
2. a county court held by such a justice.
[1250–1300; Middle English eyre < Anglo-French; Old French erre, derivative of errer to journey; see err]

Eyre

(ɛər)

n.
Lake, a shallow salt lake in NE South Australia. 3430 sq. mi. (8885 sq. km).
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.eyre - a shallow salt lake in south central Australia about 35 feet below sea levelEyre - a shallow salt lake in south central Australia about 35 feet below sea level; the largest lake in the country and the lowest point on the continent
Australia, Commonwealth of Australia - a nation occupying the whole of the Australian continent; Aboriginal tribes are thought to have migrated from southeastern Asia 20,000 years ago; first Europeans were British convicts sent there as a penal colony
Australia - the smallest continent; between the South Pacific and the Indian Ocean
References in classic literature ?
DEAR NUTT,--As I see you're working Spooks and Dooks at the same time, what about an article on that rum business of the Eyres of Exmoor; or as the old women call it down here, the Devil's Ear of Eyre?
There are plenty of instances; but you couldn't begin with a better one than the Ear of the Eyres. By the end of the week I think I can get you the truth about it.--Yours ever, FRANCIS FINN.
Though written violently, it was in excellent English; but the editor, as usual, had given to somebody else the task of breaking it up into sub-headings, which were of a spicier sort, as "Peeress and Poisons", and "The Eerie Ear", "The Eyres in their Eyrie", and so on through a hundred happy changes.
"I suppose you've been accustomed to Jane Eyres all your life.
"What shocking conduct, Miss Eyre, to strike a young gentleman, your benefactress's son!
Say your prayers, Miss Eyre, when you are by yourself; for if you don't repent, something bad might be permitted to come down the chimney and fetch you away."
"Abbot and Bessie, I believe I gave orders that Jane Eyre should be left in the red-room till I came to her myself."
The only new book which I remember to have read in those two or three years at Dayton, when I hardly remember to have read any old ones, was the novel of 'Jane Eyre,' which I took in very imperfectly, and which I associate with the first rumor of the Rochester Knockings, then just beginning to reverberate through a world that they have not since left wholly at peace.
In Eyre's Sound, in the latitude of Paris, there are immense glaciers, and yet the loftiest neighbouring mountain is only 6200 feet high.
In fact, there was a certain curious Puritanism about her, a Puritanism which found a startlingly incongruous and almost laughable expression in the Scripture almanac which hung on the wall at the end of her bed, and the Bible, and two or three Sunday-school stories which, with a copy of "Jane Eyre," were the only books that lay upon the circular mahogany table.
In 1847 Charlotte's novel 'Jane Eyre' (pronounced like the word 'air') won a great success.
The significance of 'Jane Eyre' can be suggested by calling it the last striking expression of extravagant Romanticism, partly Byronic, but grafted on the stern Bronte moral sense.