face flies

Related to face flies: cluster flies, stable flies

face flies

pl n
(Veterinary Science) flies (musca autumnalis) that attack cattle, feeding off their eye secretions
References in periodicals archive ?
Other infectious and physical factors may increase the severity and the susceptibility to the disease, including viral and Mycoplasmal infections, trauma to the eye, flies especially face flies (Musca autumnalis), ultraviolet light, dust and pollens.
Face flies constantly alight around the eyes, nose and mouth of cattle, feeding on their tears, saliva, mucus, blood and excrement.
They are also less bothered by face flies and bottle flies, thanks to their hair, though zebu are an exception since they also lack long hair.
It also controls Gulf Coast ticks and spinose ear ticks and is effective against American dog ticks, cattle fever ticks, lone star ticks, and face flies.
Face flies, usually a pest of cattle, may also affect horses, particularly when cattle are nearby.
However, when horses are pastured with or close to cattle or when face flies are numerous, these flies will feed on secretions around the eyes of horses.
Things that cause trauma include high levels of ultraviolet light, infections by viruses and mycoplasma bacteria, plant pollens, tall grasses that scrape or cut the eye while the animal grazes, dusty feed, dusty or windy conditions, and face flies.
These include viral and Mycoplasmal infections; flies especially face flies, ultraviolet light, dust and pollens.
For years I had a terrible problem with face flies, deer flies and ticks.
Sand flies and gnats are a problem in some areas, as are face flies, a newly recognized parasite in the United States.
Face flies are particularly attracted to animals which are deficient in cobalt and zinc because both of these deficiencies cause excessive tears to run down their cheeks and leave a sticky mess to which flies go.