face-centred

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face-centred

adj
(Chemistry) (of a crystal) having a lattice point at the centre of each face of each unit cell as well as at the corners. Compare body-centred
References in periodicals archive ?
The "hot" phase, austenite, takes its name after the English physicist Charles Austen; it has a face-centered cubic structure, Fig.
0] are unequal, which also shows that the [gamma]-TiAl alloy structure is different from an ordinary face-centered cubic (FCC) structure.
8, which is related to Miller indices (111), (200) and (222), respectively, were witnessed, showing that the nickel nanoparticles are face-centered cubic (FCC) nickel (PDF #04-0850) [11].
In their model, they considered two idealized arrangements of equal size particles (simple cubic and face-centered cubic) in two dimensions.
Steel alloys that operate in high-temperature situations, such as aircraft engines and metal-forming machinery, are often austenitic, meaning they have as their primary base a face-centered cubic crystal.
The problem of operating palladium membranes below 300[degrees]C is that a mixture of body-centered cubic and face-centered cubic hydride solid solution phases is formed.
Experiments were designed according to the face centered central composite design or face-centered cube (FCC) of Response Surface Methodology (RSM).
In 1611, Johannes Kepler proposed that identical spheres can crowd together no more tightly than oranges do in a grocer's stack, a formation called face-centered cubic packing.
In order to have a periodic space-filling arrangement, both the face-centered and hexagonal close packed structures, for example, introduce the octahedra, a configuration which one expects to have a higher energy.
Common crystalline structure of metallic reinforced are: face-centered cubic, body-centered cubic and hexagonal close-packed [Rufe,2002].
Mathematicians proved Kepler's assertion that the pattern of neatly stacked oranges in a grocery--a face-centered cubic packing--fills space more efficiently than any other arrangement of identical spheres (154: 103*).