faceless

(redirected from facelessness)
Also found in: Thesaurus.

face·less

 (fās′lĭs)
adj.
1. Having no face.
2. Without character or identity; anonymous: faceless soldiers guarding the compound; a faceless industrial conglomerate.

face′less·ness n.

faceless

(ˈfeɪslɪs)
adj
1. without a face
2. without identity; anonymous
ˈfacelessness n

face•less

(ˈfeɪs lɪs)

adj.
1. lacking a face.
2. lacking personal distinction or identity: a faceless mob.
3. unidentified or unidentifiable; concealing one's identity.
[1560–70]
face`less•ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.faceless - without a face or identityfaceless - without a face or identity; "a faceless apparition"; "the faceless accusers of the police state"
faced - having a face or facing especially of a specified kind or number; often used in combination; "a neatly faced terrace"

faceless

adjective impersonal, remote, unknown, unidentified, anonymous Ordinary people are at the mercy of faceless bureaucrats.
Translations
beveidis

faceless

[ˈfeɪslɪs] ADJsin rostro; (= anonymous) → anónimo

faceless

[ˈfeɪsləs] adj [people, organisation] → anonyme

faceless

[ˈfeɪslɪs] adjanonimo/a
References in periodicals archive ?
Through discussions, and more Photoshopped images and stories, other forum visitors solidified the features of the character known as Slender Man: his facelessness was nearly constant, he typically wore a black suit and he sometimes had tentacles growing out of his back.
It is also this facelessness that makes this new form of state censorship so dangerous; if the agents of misinformation cannot be identified or traced back to their masters, and if they can and do manipulate public debate in a substantive way (and there is considerable evidence to suggest this is, indeed, the case), then they essentially act as an extension of state power that cannot even be clearly discerned, let alone regulated or held accountable.
The facelessness of the torturers --referred to as "they" in the quotation--only underlines the power that they exercised over Quimpo.
'Facelessness can make above procedures succeed in successful prosecution.
oligarchy (with national, local, and global faces and facelessness) and
Saraswathy said building personal connections through traditional campaigning was a 'purer' form of democracy as opposed to the facelessness of social media.
She's now learning to grow vegetables and feels she's in a more sociable community - in contrast to the facelessness of living in a city.
As Wolfe suggests, Levinas's rendering of the animal as an unreasoning being lacking logos is metaphorically absorbed in the image of its facelessness, which is not unlike Heidegger's own reflection on the animal as a handless entity (2003, 65).
The world as seen through images became a buoy on the tides of depression that rose and fell her whole life, a state she conveyed by describing a visual portrait "as if 'I lost my face although everyone pretended I was the same as ever whatever that was.'" Photography alleviated some of that facelessness. Arbus had a firm conviction "that the mind was susceptible to visual stimuli, especially at the threshold of slumber." She put postcards on the edge of Doon's bassinet "to see when she woke up." In her last apartment, she hung her photos along with other images she liked--often macabre--on a screen near her bed, as if in a micro version of Aby Warburg's Mnemosyne Atlas, an unfinished early-modernist project to map history and memory as a series of connective images on screens.
To play with nobody, with nobody's unrecognizable facelessness especially, is to begin to renegotiate the identity of the gentleman and to begin to reconsider the particular forms of inequality that authorized this figure." See Lynch, The Economy of Character: Novels, Market Culture, and the Business of Inner Meaning (Chicago and London: University of Chicago Press, 1998), 94.
In the concluding section, "Facelessness", Edkins examines how people cope with facial disfigurement resulting from accidents or war (also called "face difference") (147).
As if to reinforce the facelessness of war, the author provides few physical details, letting the reader form the same loose attachments to the men in the trenches that Kafak does.