faceprint

faceprint

(ˈfeɪsˌprɪnt)
n
(Computer Science) a digitally recorded representation of a person's face that can be used for security purposes because it is as individual as a fingerprint
References in periodicals archive ?
faceprint for either verification or identification.
"Unlike a password, an individual's faceprint is permanent, public, and uniquely identifies its owner," wrote Franken.
It works by assigning numbers to physical characteristics such as distance between eyes, nose and ears to come up with a unique faceprint that can be used to identify someone when they've already been identified through tagging.
"These nodal points are measured creating a numerical code, called a faceprint, representing the face in the database." Id.
Discussing the project, Colonel Barakat Al Kandi who was heading the Emirati delegation in the British capital, said it was unique in that combines eyeprint, faceprint, and decimal print.
Pam Dixon, founder and executive director of the World Privacy Forum, a public interest group, says that inappropriate uses are creeping up on consumers because they don't yet recognize how powerful a simple faceprint can be.
The building needs all verification factors; this mean: username, password, biometric autentization data (fingerprint, faceprint, etc...).
Titanium's AFRS products capture human face images electronically, input the facial images into searchable files (faceprint) and, in just seconds, accurately compare the facial images to a database containing millions of faces.
Which is why the race is on for security companies to create revolutionary facial-recognition technology--which uses a video camera and computer to distinguish a person based on his or her unique "faceprint." "It's the only technology that can identify someone who's merely walking down the street," says Trevor Prout of International Biometric Group.