skull

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skull

the skeleton of the head
Not to be confused with:
scull – either of a pair of small oars used by a single rower; a small boat propelled by a scull or a pair of sculls
Abused, Confused, & Misused Words by Mary Embree Copyright © 2007, 2013 by Mary Embree

skull

 (skŭl)
n.
1. The bony or cartilaginous framework that encloses and protects the brain and sense organs of all vertebrates and of one group of nonvertebrates (the hagfishes); cranium.
2. Informal The head, regarded as the seat of thought or intelligence: Use your skull and solve the problem.
3. A death's-head.

[Middle English sculle, probably of Scandinavian origin.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

skull

(skʌl)
n
1. (Anatomy) the bony skeleton of the head of vertebrates. See cranium
2. often derogatory the head regarded as the mind or intelligence: to have a dense skull.
3. (Heraldry) a picture of a skull used to represent death or danger
[C13: of Scandinavian origin; compare Old Norse skoltr, Norwegian skult, Swedish dialect skulle]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

skull

(skʌl)

n.
1. the bony or cartilaginous framework of the vertebrate head, enclosing the brain and sense organs and including the jaws.
2. the head as the center of comprehension; mind.
[1175–1225; Middle English scolle < Old Norse skalli]
skull′-less, adj.
skull′-like`, adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

skull

(skŭl)
The part of the skeleton that forms the framework of the head, consisting of the bones that protect the brain and the bones of the face. See more at skeleton.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Skull

 a school or shoal of fish.
Dictionary of Collective Nouns and Group Terms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

skull

Twenty-two bones forming the frame of the head. All interlock rigidly except the hinged lower jawbone (mandible).
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.skull - the bony skeleton of the head of vertebratesskull - the bony skeleton of the head of vertebrates
craniometric point - a landmark on the skull from which craniometric measurements can be taken
bone, os - rigid connective tissue that makes up the skeleton of vertebrates
cheekbone, jugal bone, malar, malar bone, os zygomaticum, zygomatic, zygomatic bone - the arch of bone beneath the eye that forms the prominence of the cheek
os sphenoidale, sphenoid, sphenoid bone - butterfly-shaped bone at the base of the skull
cranial orbit, eye socket, orbital cavity, orbit - the bony cavity in the skull containing the eyeball
endocranium - membrane lining the inside of the skull
head, caput - the upper part of the human body or the front part of the body in animals; contains the face and brains; "he stuck his head out the window"
braincase, brainpan, cranium - the part of the skull that encloses the brain
jaw - the part of the skull of a vertebrate that frames the mouth and holds the teeth
axial skeleton - the part of the skeleton that includes the skull and spinal column and sternum and ribs
vomer - thin trapezoidal bone of the skull forming the posterior and inferior parts of the nasal septum
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

skull

noun
Related words
technical name cranium
adjective cranial
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002
Translations
جُمْجُمَةجُمْجُمَه
lebka
hovedskalkranium
kranio
koljukolppealuu
pääkallokallo
lubanja
koponya
hauskúpahöfuðkúpa
頭蓋骨頭骨
두개골
kaukolė
galvaskauss
craniu
lebka
lobanja
lobanja
skalle
กระโหลกศรีษะ
sọ

skull

[skʌl] Ncalavera f (Med) → cráneo m
skull and crossbones (= flag) → la bandera pirata
I can't get it into his (thick) skull thatno hay quien le meta en la cabeza que ...
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

skull

[ˈskʌl] ncrâne mskull and crossbones ntête m de mortskull cap skullcap [ˈskʌlkæp] ncalotte f
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

skull

nSchädel m; I couldn’t get it into his thick skull (inf)das wollte einfach nicht in seinen Schädel (inf); skull and crossbonesTotenkopf m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

skull

[skʌl] n (of live person) → cranio; (of dead person) → teschio (fam) (head) → testa, testona
skull and crossbones (danger warning) → teschio (flag) → bandiera dei pirati
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

skull

(skal) noun
the bony case that encloses the brain. He's fractured his skull.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

skull

جُمْجُمَة lebka kranium Schädel κρανίο cráneo pääkallo crâne lubanja teschio 頭蓋骨 두개골 schedel hodeskalle czaszka crânio череп skalle กระโหลกศรีษะ kafatası sọ 头骨
Multilingual Translator © HarperCollins Publishers 2009

skull

n. cráneo; calavera, estructura ósea de la cabeza;
base of the ___base del ___;
___ fracturesfracturas del ___.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

skull

n cráneo
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in classic literature ?
His gipsy-complexion, his fleshless cheeks, his gaunt facial bones, his dreamy eyes, his extraordinary parti-coloured hair, the puzzling contradiction between his face and figure which made him look old and young both together--were all more or less calculated to produce an unfavourable impression of him on a stranger's mind.
Fact.MR has announced the addition of the "Facial Bone Contouring Market Forecast, Trend Analysis & Competition Tracking - Global Market Insights 2018 to 2028"report to their offering.
A 36-year-old suffered a broken facial bone after he was struck by another man near Forbes Place and Causeyside Street around 5.20pm on Monday evening.
Summary: However, high cost associated with facial bone contouring is projected to hamper the growth of the global facial bone contouring market.
Symptoms of thalassemia can include fatigue, weakness, pale or yellowish skin, facial bone deformities, slow growth, abdominal swelling, and dark urine.
Warren Grayson, a professor in the department of biomedical engineering, for research that would use stem cells to help regenerate bone tissue, a new way to repair facial bone loss from cancer or congenital disorders; and
A loss of treacle decreases the production of rRNA in embryonic facial bone and tissue precursors (6).
Facial bone computed tomography (CT) showed lower anterior dentoalveolar fracture with lingual displacement, bilateral Le Fort I fractures of the maxillae, and medially displaced and fractured right condylar neck [Figure 1].
These types of injuries can be present with facial bone fractures, which may initially go unnoticed if a patient has multiple system traumas or other pressing medical concerns.
Camomot died of "multiple, bilateral rib fractures, left clavicular fractures, and extensive cranial and bilateral facial bone fractures," the team's assessment said.
Preoperative facial bone CT provides significantly more detail on the anatomy of the glabellar region and the possible varying thickness of the anterior table in this region.
In facial trauma, in about 40% cases of facial bone fractures are noted.3,4 The nasal bones are easily affected to fracture due to its central location, salient position and its low breaking strength.