facial index


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facial index

n.
The ratio of facial length to facial width multiplied by 100.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

facial index

n
1. (Anatomy) the ratio of the length of the face to the width of the face multiplied by 100: often used in comparative anthropology. Compare cranial index
2. (Anthropology & Ethnology) the ratio of the length of the face to the width of the face multiplied by 100: often used in comparative anthropology. Compare cranial index
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

fac′ial in`dex


n.
the ratio of the breadth of a face to its height.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.facial index - the ratio (in percent) of the maximum width to the maximum height of the face
ratio - the relative magnitudes of two quantities (usually expressed as a quotient)
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The facial index was calculated by dividing the measure of the distance between the nasion (N) and pogonion (Pog) points (that represent the facial height) by the measure of the interzygomatic distance (i.e., the facial width), multiplied by 100.
Cranial index and facial index was found to be significantly lower in speech and hearing impaired children in both male and female children than the control group.
(2005) was analogous to this study, being mesoprosopic and for females euryprosopic according to Garson's facial index method.
Facial index (FI) was computed as the percentage proportion of morphological face height to facial width.
Until now, researchers used traditional parameters such as head length, head width, cephalic index, facial index, and so on.
The comparison of the changes in facial index between parents, offspring, and sibling can give the clue to genetic transmission of inherited characters [7, 8].
It was observed that children who were mouth breathers had a significantly larger facial index than children who were nose breathers, that is, smaller facial width.
As Staum is careful to show, the very notion of a facial index is itself a fantasy.
That explains why his smile -- as it must be -- is both sweet and rather creepy, the facial index of a state of grace that we know to be a lie.