facial nerve


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facial nerve

n.
Either of the seventh pair of cranial nerves that control facial muscles and relay sensation from the taste buds of the front part of the tongue.

facial nerve

n
(Physiology) the seventh cranial nerve, supplying the muscles controlling facial expression, glands of the palate and nose, and the taste buds in the anterior two-thirds of the tongue

fa′cial nerve`


n.
either one of the seventh pair of cranial nerves, in mammals supplying facial muscles, the taste buds at the front of the tongue, the tear glands, and the salivary glands.
[1810–20]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.facial nerve - cranial nerve that supplies facial musclesfacial nerve - cranial nerve that supplies facial muscles
cranial nerve - any of the 12 paired nerves that originate in the brain stem
face, human face - the front of the human head from the forehead to the chin and ear to ear; "he washed his face"; "I wish I had seen the look on his face when he got the news"
References in periodicals archive ?
Congenital facial paralysis can occur as a result of facial nerve nucleus abnormalities in a variety of syndromes that include Moebius, DiGeorge, Goldenhar, CHARGE, trisomy 13, and trisomy 18.
Atlas of surgery of the facial nerve; an otolaryngologist's perspective, 2d ed.
Keratosis obturans resulting in facial nerve palsy has been rarely reported in literature.
It was intertwined with the facial nerve and causing facial paralysis.
Key Words: Bilateral facial nerve palsy, Guillain-Barre syndrome
Recently, an intraoperative continuous nerve monitoring system was implemented for assessing the facial nerve [6, 7].
Although efforts should be made to preserve the facial nerve, when there is direct tumor invasion the nerve should be resected in order to leave no gross residual disease [5].
In spite of this, there are several described causes of facial nerve paralysis in children, in approximately 40-75% of cases, the cause of unilateral FP is still unknown and it remains idiopathic (2).
Because of the theoretical risks of ablation, including bleeding and injury to the facial nerve, the patient decided to use hearing aids to manage his conductive hearing loss.
Facial nerve palsy at presentation regardless of the tumor size is highly suspicious of malignancy until proven otherwise.