Bell's palsy

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Bell's palsy

n.
A unilateral facial muscle paralysis of sudden onset, resulting from trauma, compression, or infection of the facial nerve and characterized by muscle weakness and a distorted facial expression.

[After Sir Charles Bell (1774-1842), Scottish anatomist.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Bell's palsy

n
(Pathology) a usually temporary paralysis of the muscles of the face, normally on one side
[C19: named after Sir Charles Bell (1774–1842), British anatomist]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Bell's′ pal′sy


n.
suddenly occurring paralysis that distorts one side of the face, caused by a lesion of the facial nerve.
[1855–60; after Charles Bell (1774–1842), Scottish anatomist, who first described it]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
Translations

Bell’s palsy

n (Med) → bellsche Lähmung
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

Bell's palsy

n. parálisis de Bell, parálisis de un lado de la cara causada por una afección del nervio facial.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
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References in periodicals archive ?
Keratosis obturans resulting in facial nerve palsy has been rarely reported in literature.
Literature indicates that a tick bite in EAC can result in tinnitus, facial nerve palsy, and taste disorder, though rarely (6-8).
* the reference group consisting of patients suffering from the conditions which do not alter standard parameters of CSF and blood, such as idiopathic headache and idiopathic facial nerve palsy.
Key Words: Bilateral facial nerve palsy, Guillain-Barre syndrome
It is known that neonates with facial nerve palsy are either victims of traumatic deliveries or are due to congenital facial nerve palsy.
Following surgery, the patient presented with temporary partial facial nerve palsy (House-Blackmann, grade 3) and taste disorder.
Other patients presented with facial nerve palsy, chorea and GBS as shown in Table 1.
Two months later, the patient underwent a right temporary lateral tarsorrhaphy, to protect the cornea and reduce symptoms of exposure due to right facial nerve palsy. The patient received adjuvant radiotherapy, through IAMT technique.
In the immediate onset of facial nerve palsy after trauma, the nerve is either completely lacerated or contused at the fracture site (4,6).
Clinically, she had a large, fixed, non-pulsatile left neck mass with associated hypoglossal and marginal mandibular facial nerve palsy. On intra-oral examination she had an associated left tonsillar fungating lesion.