factionary

factionary

(ˈfækʃənərɪ)
n, pl -ries
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) a member of a faction
adj
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) of or relating to a faction or factions
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
A factionary tale of Nadir Shah's justice is related in this concern:
The auditor general said that "they" apart from resorting to lobbying, "also created a script that included boogeymen, with a factionary plotinvolving intimidating scenarios to blackmail the parties that unless they voted in favour of these laws two very bad things would occur".
Rohtas 2, gallery of well-known artist Salima Hashmi located in a corner of her residence in Model Town, was the venue of a solo paintings exhibition of professional artist and art historian Samina Iqbal which was titled 'Art Factionary'.
From an economic point of view, it is expected that a decline in production and a provocation of price pressures will intensify stag factionary concerns, whereas modernization efforts will consume public funds for years to come.
The methodology used in this experiment allowed us to use the factionary experiment plans.
* Sound theology requires resistance to factionary, shallow, multi-sourced and unconsolidated approaches.
Olivera-Williams suggests that the gauchesca language becomes the Argentine language of factionary journalism (102).
[and] survived the factionary politics of the late seventeenth century by shifting allegiances while carefully hedging his bets" (Nancy McGuire, "Factionary Politics: John Crowne's Henry IV," in Culture and Society in the Stuart Restoration: Literature, Drama, History, ed.
My deductions need to be taken on faith, because in order to establish the ground for the principal observation I want to make I gloss over most of the factionary aspects that come into play during nearly every effort to isolate and abstract from the mass of evidence a few characterizing points.