faculty

(redirected from faculties)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia.
Related to faculties: cognitive faculties

faculty

a natural ability for a particular kind of action: a faculty for choosing the right friends
Not to be confused with:
ability – a general word for power, native or acquired, enabling one to do things well: an ability for math
capacity – actual or potential ability to perform or withstand: a capacity for hard work
talent – native ability or aptitude in a special field: a talent for art or music
Abused, Confused, & Misused Words by Mary Embree Copyright © 2007, 2013 by Mary Embree

fac·ul·ty

 (făk′əl-tē)
n. pl. fac·ul·ties
1.
a. An inherent power or ability: the faculty of speech.
b. A talent or natural ability for something: has a wonderful faculty for storytelling.
2.
a. (used with a sing. or pl. verb) The teachers and instructors of a school or college, or of one of its divisions, especially those considered permanent, full-time employees.
b. One of the divisions of a college or university: the faculty of law.
c. All of the members of a learned profession: the medical faculty.
3. Authorization granted by authority; conferred power.
4. Archaic An occupation; a trade.

[Middle English faculte, from Old French, from Latin facultās, power, ability, from facilis, easy; see dhē- in Indo-European roots.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

faculty

(ˈfækəltɪ)
n, pl -ties
1. one of the inherent powers of the mind or body, such as reason, memory, sight, or hearing
2. any ability or power, whether acquired or inherent
3. a conferred power or right
4. (Education)
a. a department within a university or college devoted to a particular branch of knowledge
b. the staff of such a department
c. chiefly US and Canadian all the teaching staff at a university, college, school, etc
5. (Education) all members of a learned profession
6. archaic occupation
[C14 (in the sense: department of learning): from Latin facultās capability; related to Latin facilis easy]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

fac•ul•ty

(ˈfæk əl ti)

n., pl. -ties.
1. an ability, natural or acquired, for a particular kind of action.
2. one of the powers of the mind, as memory, reason, or speech.
3. an inherent capability of the body.
4.
a. the entire teaching and administrative force of a university, college, or school.
b. one of the departments of learning, as theology, medicine, or law, in a university.
5. the members of a learned profession.
6. a power or privilege conferred by the state, a superior, etc.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Anglo-French, Middle French < Latin facultās ability, power]
syn: See ability.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

Faculty

 members of a particular profession regarded as a body; a group of persons entrusted with the government and tuition in a college or university.
Examples: faculty of advocates, 1711; of physicians and surgeons, 1511.
Dictionary of Collective Nouns and Group Terms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

faculty

Any of the distinct branches of teaching at a college or university, or the body of teachers in a particular subject.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.faculty - one of the inherent cognitive or perceptual powers of the mindfaculty - one of the inherent cognitive or perceptual powers of the mind
ability, power - possession of the qualities (especially mental qualities) required to do something or get something done; "danger heightened his powers of discrimination"
attention - the faculty or power of mental concentration; "keeping track of all the details requires your complete attention"
language, speech - the mental faculty or power of vocal communication; "language sets homo sapiens apart from all other animals"
retentiveness, retentivity, retention, memory - the power of retaining and recalling past experience; "he had a good memory when he was younger"
intellect, reason, understanding - the capacity for rational thought or inference or discrimination; "we are told that man is endowed with reason and capable of distinguishing good from evil"
sensory faculty, sentiency, sentience, sense, sensation - the faculty through which the external world is apprehended; "in the dark he had to depend on touch and on his senses of smell and hearing"
volition, will - the capability of conscious choice and decision and intention; "the exercise of their volition we construe as revolt"- George Meredith
2.faculty - the body of teachers and administrators at a schoolfaculty - the body of teachers and administrators at a school; "the dean addressed the letter to the entire staff of the university"
body - a group of persons associated by some common tie or occupation and regarded as an entity; "the whole body filed out of the auditorium"; "the student body"; "administrative body"
school - an educational institution; "the school was founded in 1900"
prof, professor - someone who is a member of the faculty at a college or university
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

faculty

noun
1. power, ability, capacity, capability, potential the severed head still retains the faculty of feeling and thinking during several seconds
2. ability, power, skill, facility, talent, gift, capacity, bent, capability, readiness, knack, propensity, aptitude, dexterity, cleverness, adroitness, turn A faculty for self-preservation is necessary when you have friends like hers.
ability failing, weakness, inability, shortcoming, weak point, unskilfulness
3. department, school, discipline, profession, branch of learning the Faculty of Social and Political Sciences
4. teaching staff, staff, teachers, professors, lecturers (chiefly U.S.) The faculty agreed on a change in the requirements
plural noun
1. powers, reason, senses, intelligence, wits, capabilities, mental abilities, physical abilities He was drunk and not in control of his faculties.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

faculty

noun
1. An innate capability:
2. Physical, mental, financial, or legal power to perform:
3. Conferred power:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
قُدْرَه، قُوَّهكُلِّيَّـهمَقْدِرَه، مَهارَهمَلَكَه، اسْتِعْداد طَبيعي
fakultaschopnosttalent
anlægevnefakultetsans
fakultás
deildhæfileikihæfileiki, gáfa
fakultetasgamtos dovanamokėjimas
fakultāteprasmespēja
doğal yetenekfakülteyetenekzihinsel yetenek

faculty

[ˈfækəltɪ] N
1. (= power of body, mind) → facultad f
to have or be in possession of all one's facultiesestar en pleno uso de sus facultades
2. (= ability) → aptitud f, facilidad f
to have a faculty for sth/doing sthtener aptitud or facilidad para algo/hacer algo
3. (Univ) → facultad f (esp US) (Univ) (= teaching staff) → profesorado m (de facultad or universidad)
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

faculty

[ˈfækəlti] n
(= physical or mental ability) → faculté f
critical faculties → sens m critique
the faculty of hearing → la faculté auditive, l'ouïe f
(British) (= group of university departments) → faculté f
medical faculty, faculty of medicine → faculté f de médecine
(British) (= staff of university departments) → corps m enseignant
(US) (= teaching staff of university) → corps m enseignant
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

faculty

n
(= power of mind)Vermögen nt, → Fähigkeit f, → Kraft f; (= ability, aptitude)Begabung f, → Talent nt; mental facultiesgeistige Fähigkeiten pl, → Geisteskräfte pl; faculty of reasonVernunft f; faculty of hearing/sightHör-/Sehvermögen nt; to be in (full) possession of (all) one’s facultiesim Vollbesitz seiner Kräfte sein; to have a faculty for doing somethingein Talent dafür haben, etw zu tun
(Univ) → Fakultät f; the medical faculty, the faculty of medicinedie medizinische Fakultät; the Faculty (= staff)der Lehrkörper
(Eccl) → Vollmacht f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

faculty

[ˈfækltɪ] nfacoltà f inv (Am) (teaching staff) → corpo insegnante
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

faculty

(ˈfӕkəlti) plural ˈfaculties noun
1. a power of the mind. the faculty of reason.
2. a natural power of the body. the faculty of hearing.
3. ability or skill. She has a faculty for saying the right thing.
4. (often with capital) a section of a university. the Faculty of Arts/Science.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

fac·ul·ty

n. facultad.
1. cuerpo facultativo;
2. aptitud o habilidad para llevar a cabo funciones normales.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

faculty

n (pl -ties) facultad f
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in classic literature ?
Then opinion and knowledge have to do with different kinds of matter corresponding to this difference of faculties?
I will begin by placing faculties in a class by themselves: they are powers in us, and in all other things, by which we do as we do.
'That chap, sir,' said John, taking it out again after a time, and pointing at him with the stem, 'though he's got all his faculties about him--bottled up and corked down, if I may say so, somewheres or another--'
The mensuration of the faculties of the mind has, I believe, no place in the catalogue of known arts.
His new idea was to use the faculties of Oolanga, so far as he could, in the service of discovery.
The relative proportions of these two faculties vary greatly in books of different sorts.
'The having of general ideas,' saith he, 'is that which puts a perfect distinction betwixt man and brutes, and is an excellency which the faculties of brutes do by no means attain unto.
It is probable that the latent emotions of this parting hour had revived, in some degree, his bedimmed and enfeebled faculties. At any rate, Phoebe soon felt that, if not the profound insight of a seer, yet a more than feminine delicacy of appreciation, was making her heart the subject of its regard.
The diversity in the faculties of men, from which the rights of property originate, is not less an insuperable obstacle to a uniformity of interests.
Or perhaps his facility is deeper seated, in the increased range of his faculties of observation, which yield him points of interest wherever fresh objects meet his eyes.
With Hareton the resemblance is carried farther: it is singular at all times, THEN it was particularly striking; because his senses were alert, and his mental faculties wakened to unwonted activity.
There is in human nature generally, more of the fool than of the wise; and therefore those faculties, by which the foolish part of men's minds is taken, are most potent.

Full browser ?