fade-in


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fade-in

or fade·in (fād′ĭn′)
n.
A gradual appearance of an image, light, or sound, especially as a transition in a cinematic work, audio recording, or performance.

fade-in

n
1. (Film) films an optical effect in which a shot appears gradually out of darkness
2. (Telecommunications) a gradual increase in the volume in a radio or television broadcast
vb (adverb)
(Telecommunications) Also: fade up to increase or cause to increase gradually, as vision or sound in a film or broadcast

fade′-in`



n.
1. a gradual increase in the visibility of a film or television scene.
2. a gradual increase in the volume of broadcast or recorded sound.
[1915–20]
Translations

fade-in

[ˈfeɪdɪn] N (Cine, TV) → (entrada f en) fundido m

fade-in

[ˈfeɪdˌɪn] n (Cine) → dissolvenza in apertura (Radio) → aumento graduale del suono
References in periodicals archive ?
Eric Gautier's luminous, sun-dappled compositions remain as steady as the editing by Luc Bamier and Mathilde Van de Moortel, which compounds the film's slightly muted feel with regular fade-ins and fade-outs.
In the UK, Love was excerpted as a single (featuring a version of the song without the slow fade-ins) and reached number 41.
Lap dissolves have lost much of the appeal they had back when Citizen Kane (1941) introduced the Xanadu manse through an ominous series of overlapping images, each fading out as the subsequent one faded in, or when La Jetee (1962) utilized the transition for a more subjective sequence in which, according to the narrator, "images begin to ooze like confessions." By now, our eyes have become so conditioned by the more jarring interruptions of jump cuts and channel hops that multiple fade-outs and fade-ins seem rather hokey, relegated to "lesser" forms like screen savers and club visuals.
Not only did the fade-ins and fade-outs punctuate the diegesis, but the darkness, whether partial or total, illustrated the varying degrees of intensity in the outrage.
There are no fade-ins or fade-outs in the film to give the players a momentary break."
They even got used to the "fade-outs and fade-ins which seemed to happen for no reason," as Rixon put it.
The idea that Kuleshov's use of fade-ins and fade-outs is evidence of 'stylistic exuberance' (p.
They wisely did away with the tinny fade-ins and fade-outs used for the first "best of" collection, and overall the engineering is good.