fade-out

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fade-out

or fade·out (fād′out′)
n.
A gradual diminishing in intensity of an image, light, or sound to imperceptibility, especially as a transition in a visual or audio recording.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

fade-out

n
1. (Film) films an optical effect in which a shot slowly disappears into darkness
2. (Telecommunications) a gradual reduction in signal strength in a radio or television broadcast
3. (Telecommunications) a gradual and temporary loss of a received radio or television signal due to atmospheric disturbances, magnetic storms, etc
4. a slow or gradual disappearance
vb (adverb)
(Telecommunications) to decrease or cause to decrease gradually, as vision or sound in a film or broadcast
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

fade′-out`



n.
1. a gradual decrease in the visibility of a film or television scene.
2. a gradual decrease in the volume of broadcast or recorded sound.
3. a gradual disappearance or reduction.
[1915–20]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:

fade-out

or fadeout
noun
1. The act or an example of passing out of sight:
2. A gradual disappearance, especially of a film image:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations

fade-out

[ˈfeɪdaʊt] N (Cine, TV) → fundido m (en negro), (cierre m en) fundido m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

fade-out

[ˈfeɪdˌaʊt] n (Cine) → dissolvenza in chiusura; (Radio) → diminuzione f graduale del suono
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
Anissa's relationships are blatantly sexual--there's no pretense or fade-outs. The kissing, the emotion, the pillow talk--it's relatable and believable.
Yes, the Giants have suffered serious fade-outs in many of their games this season, when they've battled their way into a potentially match-winning position and then conceded tries in the final quarter to throw the game away.
Due to improved crosslinking, even the finest vignettes with soft fade-outs can be easily reproduced.
If we can sort out our second half fade-outs in matches it really could turn out to be a half-decent season at Anfield.
Much has been made of Kerry's second half fade-outs in big games this year, most notably the League win over Tyrone which saved them from relegation, the Munster final victory over Cork and their most recent outing, the lacklustre quarter-final against Cavan.
Severely lacking in structure, landmark images, title cards and fade-outs are all but ignored as the music stampedes on.
Eric Gautier's luminous, sun-dappled compositions remain as steady as the editing by Luc Bamier and Mathilde Van de Moortel, which compounds the film's slightly muted feel with regular fade-ins and fade-outs.
The single-finger trigger adjusts from fine feathering to fade-outs and has uniform material distribution.
Although Jonathan Byrd is not a player you want to be backing on Sunday - he has twice wasted seriously good positions with last-round fade-outs at Kapalua and Scottsdale - he is still putting good numbers together and looks the pick at 100-30 in Stan James's Group D.
Lap dissolves have lost much of the appeal they had back when Citizen Kane (1941) introduced the Xanadu manse through an ominous series of overlapping images, each fading out as the subsequent one faded in, or when La Jetee (1962) utilized the transition for a more subjective sequence in which, according to the narrator, "images begin to ooze like confessions." By now, our eyes have become so conditioned by the more jarring interruptions of jump cuts and channel hops that multiple fade-outs and fade-ins seem rather hokey, relegated to "lesser" forms like screen savers and club visuals.
Not only did the fade-ins and fade-outs punctuate the diegesis, but the darkness, whether partial or total, illustrated the varying degrees of intensity in the outrage.