fair-weather


Also found in: Idioms.

fair-weath·er

(fâr′wĕth′ər)
adj.
1. Suitable or used only during fair weather: fair-weather hiking gear.
2. Present and dependable only in good times: fair-weather friends.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

fair-weather

adj
1. suitable for use in fair weather only
2. not reliable or present in situations of hardship or difficulty (esp in the phrase fair-weather friend)
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

fair′-weath`er



adj.
1. used in or intended for fair weather only.
2. weakening or failing in time of trouble: His fair-weather friends left him when he lost his job.
[1730–40]

Fair•weath•er

(ˈfɛərˌwɛð ər)

n.
Mount, a mountain in SE Alaska. 15,292 ft. (4660 m).
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in classic literature ?
We have our ponchos, and we are not fair-weather explorers.
I want no fair-weather birds holding down my office chairs or anything else.
It is a fair-weather model that works well only in times of prosperity.
It only works in fair-weather. But doesn't work in foul weather.
FAIR-WEATHER postmen have warned they will not be delivering the mail in bad weather after one of them slipped over in the rain.
Fair-weather fans were left fuming after his last visit two years ago when he stuck to obscure back catalogue stuff.
I have to say I'm a bit of a fair-weather diver - and I don't do it in Britain because it's too cold.'