fairgoer

fairgoer

(ˈfɛəˌɡəʊə)
n
a person attending a fair
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
For one price, a fairgoer can enjoy all that the Bolton Fair has to offer during the entire weekend with a multi-day pass.
For a single price of admission (midway and pony rides extra), a fairgoer can enjoy all the fair has to offer.
"I thought it was fun and I was really flattered that they chose me," was the response of the chief, who was so amused that at one point he went over to Scarecrow Chief and knelt down next to it so a fairgoer could take a photo of the two of them together.
"I wonder if it's seedless," mused one fairgoer, while another wondered how such a perfect melon could be grown in New England.
"The fairgoer may benefit by having a fair rather than not having a fair if they weren't able to keep the operation going."
Kris Kimbro, of Jewett City, Conn., shouted to his fiancee, first-time fairgoer Suzanne Lotocki of Jewett City, "Honey!
One fairgoer said: "It was sad to see a legend like Paul unable to kick a ball straight.
Caption: A young fairgoer in Belton, Texas, tries an exhibitor's flavored root beers.
A FAIRGOER who won a goldfish at a games stall posted a video of himself eating it alive on Facebook.
"In the selection I look for the photo that is going to reach the potential fairgoer on the personal level," said Williams.
The snaps, which were provided by fairgoer Abigail Czapsky to the Huffington Post, show Obama on a board next to stars at a dart game stall.
Fairgoer amusement was a priori, so fair organizers failed to recognize the constant pressures Native performers were under, nor did they question the authenticity or presentation of Native performances.