fairies


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Related to fairies: Types of fairies

fair·y

 (fâr′ē)
n. pl. fair·ies
1. An imaginary being in human form, depicted as clever, mischievous, and possessing magical powers.
2. Offensive Slang Used as a disparaging term for a gay man.

[Middle English fairie, fairyland, enchanted being, from Old French faerie, from fae, fairy, from Vulgar Latin *Fāta, goddess of fate, from Latin fāta, the Fates, pl. of fātum, fate; see fate.]

fairies

Air elementals who live in light and thought.
References in classic literature ?
It is frightfully difficult to know much about the fairies, and almost the only thing known for certain is that there are fairies wherever there are children.
When you were a bird you knew the fairies pretty well, and you remember a good deal about them in your babyhood, which it is a great pity you can't write down, for gradually you forget, and I have heard of children who declared that they had never once seen a fairy.
Everybody has heard of the Little House in the Kensington Gardens, which is the only house in the whole world that the fairies have built for humans.
Angela Clare, who loves to have a tooth extracted because then she is treated to tea in a shop, saw more than one light, she saw hundreds of them all together, and this must have been the fairies building the house, for they build it every night and always in a different part of the Gardens.
THREE little Fairies sat in the fields eating their breakfast; each among the leaves of her favorite flower, Daisy, Primrose, and Violet, were happy as Elves need be.
Then sweet music sounded on the air, and the loud tones were hushed, as in wondering silence the Fairies waited what should come.
The winged fairies of Grimm and Andersen have brought more happiness to childish hearts than all other human creations.
why Fairies should always be teaching us to do our duty, and lecturing us when we go wrong, and we should never teach them anything?
I may tell you, besides, that she had no wings (I don't believe in Fairies with wings), and that she had quantities of long brown hair and large earnest brown eyes, and then I shall have done all I can to give you an idea of her.
So I ran away to Kensington Gardens and lived a long long time among the fairies.
Wendy had lived such a home life that to know fairies struck her as quite delightful.
They were cousins as well as neighbours, and both were under the protection of the fairies; though it is only fair to say that the fairies did not love them half so well as their wives did.