fallacy

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Related to fallacies: Logical fallacies

fal·la·cy

 (făl′ə-sē)
n. pl. fal·la·cies
1. A false notion.
2. A statement or an argument based on a false or invalid inference.
3. Incorrectness of reasoning or belief; erroneousness.
4. The quality of being deceptive.

[Alteration of Middle English fallace, from Old French, from Latin fallācia, deceit, from fallāx, fallāc-, deceitful, from fallere, to deceive.]

fallacy

(ˈfæləsɪ)
n, pl -cies
1. an incorrect or misleading notion or opinion based on inaccurate facts or invalid reasoning
2. unsound or invalid reasoning
3. the tendency to mislead
4. (Logic) logic an error in reasoning that renders an argument logically invalid
[C15: from Latin fallācia, from fallax deceitful, from fallere to deceive]

fal•la•cy

(ˈfæl ə si)

n., pl. -cies.
1. a deceptive, misleading, or false notion, belief, etc.; misconception.
2. a misleading or unsound argument.
3. erroneousness.
4. any of various types of erroneous reasoning that render arguments logically unsound.
5. Obs. deception.
[1350–1400; Middle English fallace < Middle French < Latin fallācia a trick, deceit]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.fallacy - a misconception resulting from incorrect reasoning
pseudoscience - an activity resembling science but based on fallacious assumptions
misconception - an incorrect conception
logical fallacy - a fallacy in logical argumentation
pathetic fallacy - the fallacy of attributing human feelings to inanimate objects; `the friendly sun' is an example of the pathetic fallacy
sophism, sophistry, sophistication - a deliberately invalid argument displaying ingenuity in reasoning in the hope of deceiving someone
paralogism - an unintentionally invalid argument

fallacy

fallacy

noun
1. An erroneous or false idea:
2. Plausible but invalid reasoning:
Translations
مَظْهَر خادِع، مُغالَطَه
bludklamomyl
fejlslutningvildfarelse
téveszme
röng hugmynd, villa
klaidinga nuomonėklaidingas įsitikinimas
kļūdamaldi

fallacy

[ˈfæləsɪ] N (= false belief) → falacia f; (= false reasoning) → sofisma m, argucia f

fallacy

[ˈfæləsi] nidée f fausse
it is a fallacy that ... → il est faux de croire que ...

fallacy

nIrrtum m; (in logic) → Fehlschluss m, → Trugschluss m; a popular fallacyein weitverbreiteter Irrtum

fallacy

[ˈfæləsɪ] nerrore m

fallacy

(ˈfӕləsi) plural ˈfallacies noun
a wrong idea or belief, usually one that is generally believed to be true; false reasoning. That belief is just a fallacy.
fallacious (fəˈleiʃəs) adjective
wrong, mistaken or showing false reasoning. a fallacious argument.
References in classic literature ?
"Never in all my life have I heard so many fallacies uttered in one short hour.
When I said that you stimulated me I meant, to be frank, that in noting your fallacies I was occasionally guided towards the truth.
Facts are stubborn things, but as some one has wisely said, not half so stubborn as fallacies. So I only smile loftily now in eloquent silence.
As usual there were plenty of ad homs and logical fallacies ("religious zealots", "high priests of denial", "scientific consensus") but also, not a grain of proof was offered.
Manama, July 26 (BNA): More Bahraini families have voiced their strong condemnation and rejection of the Qatari regime's flagrant interference in the kingdom's domestic affairs, and the fallacies and fabrications aired by the Qatari media for the sake of subverting Bahrain's security and undermining its sovereignty.
Synopsis: Many serious leftists have learned to distrust talk of logic and logical fallacies, associated with right-wing "logicbros".
Ecological fallacies are abundant in our profession.
But if you rely on inductive reasoning, be on guard for logical fallacies that your opponents will identify to your detriment.
For this purpose, some advertisements from the print media are selected and analysed through three Aristotelian fallacies namely fallacy of authority, the fallacy of majority and appeal to authority along with three strategies of logos, pathos, and ethos as given by Aristotle.
Ajai Gaur and Ram Mudambi, professors of international business strategy at Rutgers University and Temple University, analyze four fallacies associated with trade, globalization and manufacturing in advanced economies.
"Texas Identities" addresses what constitutes a Texas identity and how it may such change over time; what myths, memories, and fallacies contribute to making a Texas identity; whether or not the myths and memories that define Texas identity true or fallacious; and whether or not there is more than one Texas identity?
"Everybody translates it to the probability, or its complement, of the hypothesis at hand" He shows that the arguments commonly used to justify p-values are fallacies. It is far past time for the "ineradicable Cult of Point-Oh-Five" to go, he states.