fallacious

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fal·la·cious

 (fə-lā′shəs)
adj.
1. Containing or based on a fallacy: a fallacious assumption.
2. Tending to mislead; deceptive: fallacious testimony.

fal·la′cious·ly adv.
fal·la′cious·ness n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

fallacious

(fəˈleɪʃəs)
adj
1. (Logic) containing or involving a fallacy; illogical; erroneous
2. tending to mislead
3. delusive or disappointing: a fallacious hope.
falˈlaciously adv
falˈlaciousness n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

fal•la•cious

(fəˈleɪ ʃəs)

adj.
1. containing a fallacy; logically unsound: fallacious arguments.
2. deceptive; misleading.
[1500–10; < Latin fallāx deceitful]
fal•la′cious•ly, adv.
fal•la′cious•ness, n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.fallacious - containing or based on a fallacyfallacious - containing or based on a fallacy; "fallacious reasoning"; "an unsound argument"
invalid - having no cogency or legal force; "invalid reasoning"; "an invalid driver's license"
2.fallacious - intended to deceive; "deceitful advertising"; "fallacious testimony"; "smooth, shining, and deceitful as thin ice" - S.T.Coleridge; "a fraudulent scheme to escape paying taxes"
dishonest, dishonorable - deceptive or fraudulent; disposed to cheat or defraud or deceive
3.fallacious - based on an incorrect or misleading notion or information; "fallacious hope"
incorrect, wrong - not correct; not in conformity with fact or truth; "an incorrect calculation"; "the report in the paper is wrong"; "your information is wrong"; "the clock showed the wrong time"; "found themselves on the wrong road"; "based on the wrong assumptions"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

fallacious

adjective incorrect, wrong, mistaken, false, misleading, untrue, deceptive, spurious, fictitious, illogical, erroneous, illusory, delusive, delusory, sophistic, sophistical Their argument is fallacious.
Quotations
"The conclusion of your syllogism, I said lightly, is fallacious, being based upon licensed premises" [Flann O'Brien At Swim-Two-Birds]
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

fallacious

adjective
1. Containing fundamental errors in reasoning:
2. Containing an error or errors:
Idioms: all wet, in error, off base, off the mark.
3. Tending to lead one into error:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
خَدّاع، مُضَلِّل
klamnýmylný
falskfejlagtig
villandi; rangur, órökréttur
mylný

fallacious

[fəˈleɪʃəs] ADJ (= incorrect) → erróneo; (= misleading) → engañoso, falaz
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

fallacious

[fəˈleɪʃəs] (formal) adj [idea, argument, reason] → fallacieux/euse
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

fallacious

adjirrig; argumenttrugschlüssig
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

fallacious

[fəˈleɪʃs] adj (frm) → fallace
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

fallacy

(ˈfӕləsi) plural ˈfallacies noun
a wrong idea or belief, usually one that is generally believed to be true; false reasoning. That belief is just a fallacy.
fallacious (fəˈleiʃəs) adjective
wrong, mistaken or showing false reasoning. a fallacious argument.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
We averaged four mass-meetings a week for the voyage--we seemed always in labor in this way, and yet so often fallaciously that whenever at long intervals we were safely delivered of a resolution, it was cause for public rejoicing, and we hoisted the flag and fired a salute.
It is high time that Indians should themselves seek the establishment of a National Truth Commission mandated to establish the facts on the attacks of 26 November 2008 rather than blaming Pakistan fallaciously.
Lastly, by demonstrating how Spinoza fallaciously understood Time and freedom, this article intended that a different understanding of these issues could emerge, with the help of Bergson's philosophy of Time, allowing us to declare that the conditions for the possibility of free-will could still be.
Do I have to work overtime to get ahead in my career?People work late for a variety of reasons, among them the practice of flexi time, where employees may come in and leave work a bit late, cases of deadlines that need to be beaten, avoiding the tyranny of rush hour, escaping other spheres of life or, indeed, an attempt to impress bosses who fallaciously equate leaving work late to their teams' degree of commitment to duty or output.
'The economic managers will fallaciously claim that relatively slower inflation in the first few months of 2019 proves that TRAIN and the additional fuel excise taxes are not inflationary,' Ibon said.
In December of 2011, at a Top American Leaders Forum broadcast on C-SPAN, Christie calls out commentators, including Robinson (2011), Kinsley (2011), and others, claiming that their concerns about his potential run for president and his weight fallaciously assume that fatness demonstrates a lack of discipline.
He has drawn fallaciously a parallel between Z.A Bhutto and the present leadership.
Besides, they argue that "Pogue's model fallaciously uses continuous discounting in the belief that it represents continuous cash flows" (Ismail & Cline, 2005, p.
People love to anthropomorphise animals, often fallaciously.
Explicit consent would not be required if, as has been fallaciously argued, we could be sure that all patients admitted to training hospitals appreciate their secondary role as 'training material' and implicitly agree to this by being admitted to what they should know is a training institute.
Unfortunately, he turns his catalog of advances into an apologia for scientism, fallaciously drawing the inference that the methods that have afforded such practical benefits can answer every question, or that if they can't, then the question must not be worth asking.
Part II concludes by describing the two ways that contemporary courts fallaciously assume neutrality.