fallibilist


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fallibilist

(ˈfælɪbəlɪst)
n
(Philosophy) a supporter of fallibilism
adj
(Philosophy) of or relating to fallibilism
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Such was the modesty of an uncompromising fallibilist for whom the entanglement of fact and value was self-evident.
Moreover, it is not entirely clear that Vannatta believes that Burke rejects the existence of transcendent truths; at times it appears that it may be that he merely considers Burke a moderate fallibilist.
But one can be a fallibilist about the human propensity to err while still maintaining belief in objective reality.
This article examines avenues for resolving what appears to be an inherent tension in the fallibilist argument for pluralism in economics.
Popper understood the notion of the existence of essence from an Aristotelian perspective, albeit within this fallibilist epistemology.
So a fallibilist who seeks to accommodate our strong presumption in favour of the possibility of knowledge and so halt the closure-based sceptical argument can restrict the principle with no such folk-intuitive costs.
Juhl and Loomis think that Quine adopts a fallibilist attitude toward all the statements used in a given theory, and adopts a naturalistic conception of philosophy that sees science and philosophy as forming a continuum of inquiry and theory.
Open-mindedness flourishes in the context of a suitably fallibilist view of human inquiry (Rescher, 1999, p.
Accordingly, in that work, he was able only to indicate why, to him, it seemed that a fallibilist, realist approach--and its associated procedures--were attractive, but to stress that the choice of these different competing aims was, indeed, a matter of choice
a) Perceptions of the Nature of Mathematics (11 itemS,): In this subscale the teachers' orientation towards mathematics such as absolutist, Platonic, instrumentalist, problem solving and fallibilist view of mathematics were explored.
All sorts of intra-libertarian internecine squabbles follow along the same rough lines of the split between the hardcore, no-compromise, anti-statist Rothbardian and the more classical liberal, utilitarian, fallibilist, and prudential Hayekian.
On one understanding, Rorty might sound like he is toeing a fallibilist line which accepts that while truth is an absolute notion consisting of correspondence to a 'non-description-relative, intrinsic nature of reality', (31) nevertheless our knowledge of that reality is always fallible, justified as it is within the inevitable confines of human practices.