fallibility


Also found in: Thesaurus, Wikipedia.

fal·li·ble

 (făl′ə-bəl)
adj.
1. Capable of making an error: Humans are only fallible.
2. Tending or likely to be erroneous: fallible hypotheses.

[Middle English, from Medieval Latin fallibilis, from Latin fallere, to deceive.]

fal′li·bil′i·ty, fal′li·ble·ness n.
fal′li·bly adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.fallibility - the likelihood of making errors
undependability, undependableness, unreliability, unreliableness - the trait of not being dependable or reliable
errancy - fallibility as indicated by erring or a tendency to err
infallibility - the quality of never making an error
Translations

fallibility

[ˌfælɪˈbɪlɪtɪ] Nfalibilidad f

fallibility

[ˌfælɪˈbɪlɪti] nfaillibilité f

fallibility

nFehlbarkeit f

fallibility

[ˌfælɪˈbɪlɪtɪ] nfallibilità f inv
References in classic literature ?
A CELEBRATED Divine having affirmed the fallibility of the Bible, was asked why, then, he preached the religion founded upon it.
An admirable faculty, if it were infallible; but, as this degree of perfection is not even claimed by more than one mortal being; so from the fallibility of such acute discernment have arisen many sad mischiefs and most grievous heart-aches to innocence and virtue.
This is altogether as bitter an enemy to guilt as the former is to innocence: nor can I see it in an unamiable light, even though, through human fallibility, it should be sometimes mistaken.
In 1806 Pfuel had been one of those responsible, for the plan of campaign that ended in Jena and Auerstadt, but he did not see the least proof of the fallibility of his theory in the disasters of that war.
The fallibility of introspection as regards what we desire is made evident by psycho-analysis; its fallibility as to what we know is easily demonstrated.
Nor will they barely make allowances for the errors which may be chargeable on the fallibility to which the convention, as a body of men, were liable; but will keep in mind, that they themselves also are but men, and ought not to assume an infallibility in rejudging the fallible opinions of others.
In the eyes of many, Benedetto appeared, if not a victim to, at least an instance of, the fallibility of the law.
"Then I can no longer hesitate as to my course," said Lydgate; "but the first thing I must impress on you is that my conclusions are doubly uncertain--uncertain not only because of my fallibility, but because diseases of the heart are eminently difficult to found predictions on.
Yet I have heard you speak so often with broad charity of the fallibility and frailty of humankind.
In which case, shouldn't their pay packages reflect their fallibility? A corporate culture that says decisions taken by those at the top are the be all and end all of business success, while everyone else is just a cost to be controlled, has made the UK one of the most unequal countries in Europe.
In a month where I had to make more visits to my osteopath than I care to remember, I feel only too aware of the fallibility of the body as it ages.
Their fallibility is now a matter of record, undone on their favourite Trent Bridge pitch by opponents they had just defeated 4-0 only weeks ago.