fallible


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fal·li·ble

 (făl′ə-bəl)
adj.
1. Capable of making an error: Humans are only fallible.
2. Tending or likely to be erroneous: fallible hypotheses.

[Middle English, from Medieval Latin fallibilis, from Latin fallere, to deceive.]

fal′li·bil′i·ty, fal′li·ble·ness n.
fal′li·bly adv.

fallible

(ˈfælɪbəl)
adj
1. capable of being mistaken; erring
2. liable to mislead
[C15: from Medieval Latin fallibilis, from Latin fallere to deceive]
ˌfalliˈbility, ˈfallibleness n
ˈfallibly adv

fal•li•ble

(ˈfæl ə bəl)

adj.
1. liable to err, esp. in being deceived or mistaken.
2. liable to be erroneous or false; not accurate: fallible information.
[1375–1425; late Middle English < Medieval Latin fallibilis= Latin fall(ere) to deceive + -ibilis -ible]
fal`li•bil′i•ty, fal′li•ble•ness, n.
fal′li•bly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.fallible - likely to fail or make errors; "everyone is fallible to some degree"
infallible - incapable of failure or error; "an infallible antidote"; "an infallible memory"; "the Catholic Church considers the Pope infallible"; "no doctor is infallible"
2.fallible - wanting in moral strength, courage, or will; having the attributes of man as opposed to e.g. divine beings; "I'm only a fallible human"; "frail humanity"
human - having human form or attributes as opposed to those of animals or divine beings; "human beings"; "the human body"; "human kindness"; "human frailty"

fallible

Translations
قابِل للخَطَأ
omylný
ufuldkommen
esendõ
skeikull
linkęs klysti
spējīgs kļūdīties
omylný
hata yapabiliryanılabilir

fallible

[ˈfæləbl] ADJfalible

fallible

[ˈfælɪbəl] adj [person] → faillible; [system] → failliblefalling-off [ˌfɔːlɪŋˈɒf] n
a falling-off in sth [+ demand, income] → une diminution de qch; [+ standards] → une dégradation de qchfalling-out [ˌfɔːlɪŋˈaʊt] n (= disagreement) → brouille f
to have a falling-out with sb → se brouiller avec qnfallopian tube [fəˌləʊpiənˈtjuːb] ntrompe f de Fallope

fallible

fallible

[ˈfæləbl] adj (frm) → fallibile

fallible

(ˈfӕləbl) adjective
able or likely to make mistakes. Human beings are fallible.
References in classic literature ?
If it is fallible," he replied, "there is the greater reason that I explain it, lest it mislead.
She is a daughter of earth; you are an angel of heaven; only be not too austere in your divinity, and remember that I am a poor, fallible mortal.
Worldly wisdom may force them into widely different ways of life; worldly wisdom may delude them, or may make them delude themselves, into contracting an earthly and a fallible union.
He is very, distinctly fallible, but I think his life is not less instructive because in certain things it seems a failure.
The human and fallible should not arrogate a power with which the divine and perfect alone can be safely intrusted.
Let experience, the least fallible guide of human opinions, be appealed to for an answer to these inquiries.
As long as the reason of man continues fallible, and he is at liberty to exercise it, different opinions will be formed.
Even here there might be a mistake: human prescriptions were fallible things: Lydgate had said that treatment had hastened death,--why not his own method of treatment?
All his other senses may be fallible, but not his sense of smell, and so he makes assurance positive by the final test.
And just because we are not misled by familiarity we find it easier to be cautious in interpreting behaviour when we are dealing with phenomena remote from those of our own minds: Moreover, introspection, as psychoanalysis has demonstrated, is extraordinarily fallible even in cases where we feel a high degree of certainty.
Macey's official respect should restrain him from subjecting the parson's performance to that criticism with which minds of extraordinary acuteness must necessarily contemplate the doings of their fallible fellow-men.
What Heavens Lord had powerfullest to send Against us from about his Throne, and judg'd Sufficient to subdue us to his will, But proves not so: then fallible, it seems, Of future we may deem him, though till now Omniscient thought.