falling rhythm

falling rhythm

n.
A rhythmic pattern in which the stress occurs on the first syllable of each foot, as in Jack and Jill went up the hill.

fall′ing rhythm′


n.
a prosodic pattern in which each metrical foot has one accented syllable followed by one or more unaccented syllables.
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References in periodicals archive ?
They were full of glorious things: rising rhythm, falling rhythm, feet with Greek names, stanzas from Longfellow's "Psalm of Life," John Drinkwater, and Swinburne.
Hopkins is aware of the tradeoff, but continues to advocate it even after he makes the relatively superficial change from rising to falling rhythm. He openly concedes the shortcomings of the system, that the "real nature of the verse" admits a variety of contrasting rhythms that cannot be fully represented (Correspondence, p.
So it does, but the placement of a polysyllabic word over a foot boundary can also give a falling rhythm even in a perfectly regular iambic pentameter.
The reverse is falling rhythm, as in John Dryden's line:
Slick and contemporary, Air was all incremental builds and rising and falling rhythms. At one notable point, it was as though the trumpet and Kennedy's guitar were mirroring a conversation.
Slick and contemporary, Air was all incremental builds and rising and falling rhythms. At one notable point, it was as if the trumpet and Kennedy's guitar were mirroring a conversation.
His preferred method of commentary involves surprisingly superficial remarks on alliteration ("those l- and v- and r-sounds cascade through 'leaps from lava,' then 'riverward over rock / reverberating ...") and meter ("falling rhythms ...