false positive


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false positive

n.
A test result that is false-positive.

false positive

n
1. (Medicine) a result in a medical test that wrongly indicates the presence of the condition being tested for
2. (Medicine) a person from whom such a result is obtained
References in periodicals archive ?
DBT is associated with fewer false positive exams in the screening setting, but there is limited research on the impact of DBT on false positive exams in the diagnostic setting.
9) The odds of a false positive vary, depending on the specificity of the immunoassay used and the substance under detection.
A recent "Commentary" article in the journal Nature highlights the prevalence and negative impact of false-positive publications and discusses strategies to avoid reporting false positives as novel findings (1).
By adopting effective False Positive Reduction mechanisms and regularly enhancing their AML systems, institutions can achieve acceptable rates of False Positives as they comply with risk regulations," said Hazem Mulhim, CEO, EastNets.
One can arrive at the relative costs by deciding how many false positives one will accept for every false negative, or equivalently, how many false negatives one will accept for every false positive.
Hospitals' initial urine- screening drug tests on pregnant women can produce a high rate of false positives -- particularly for methamphetamine and opiates -- because they are technically complex and interpretation of the results can be difficult, some experts say.
Counselors continued to explain to patients that any reactive rapid tests required Western blot confirmation but also emphasized that discordant oral fluid and whole-blood test results were likely to be false positive.
The extra expense results from the high number of harmless anomalies, or false positives, that scans turn up and that doctors must then check out (SN: 9/20/03, p.
False positive results may cause applications to be postponed until other additional requirements are met or may otherwise result in adverse actions being taken--both outcomes tend to cause some applicants who would otherwise present good risks to take their business elsewhere, resulting in good business lost.
The real problem is in deciding how precautionary to be in the face of inevitable uncertainties, demanding that we understand the equally inevitable false positives and false negatives from screening evidence.
False positives can occur with viral load tests, but a review of the data in the August, 1999 American Family Physician (1) suggests it is usually possible to differentiate these from the real thing: "During the symptomatic phase of acute HIV infection, the viral RNA shows in excess of 50,000 copies per mL.