false flax


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Noun1.false flax - annual and biennial herbs of Mediterranean to central Asiafalse flax - annual and biennial herbs of Mediterranean to central Asia
dilleniid dicot genus - genus of more or less advanced dicotyledonous trees and shrubs and herbs
Brassicaceae, Cruciferae, family Brassicaceae, family Cruciferae, mustard family - a large family of plants with four-petaled flowers; includes mustards, cabbages, broccoli, turnips, cresses, and their many relatives
Camelina sativa, gold of pleasure - annual European false flax having small white flowers; cultivated since Neolithic times as a source of fiber and for its oil-rich seeds; widely naturalized in North America
References in periodicals archive ?
2012) evaluated the feeding effect of dietary conjugated linoleic acid and false flax seed oil on bone quality in broiler chicken.
Resistance to the flea beetle Phyllotreta cruciferae (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) in false flax, Camelina sativa (Brassicaceae).
Known in the West as false flax, wild flax, linseed dodder, German sesame and Siberian oilseed, camelina is attracting increased scientific interest for its oleaginous qualities.
In English it's usually known as Camelina, gold-of-pleasure, and also called false flax.
Also referred to as wild flax, false flax, or gold of pleasure, camelina grows well in colder climates.
False flax (Camelina sativa) as an example of such alternative sources of raw material is one of the oldest cultural plants.
It is related to the mustard plant and is also known as false flax or gold of pleasure.
Also known as false flax or gold-of-pleasure, it thrives in the semi-arid conditions of the Northern Plains.
Camelina, also known as gold-of-pleasure or false flax, is an energy crop, given its high oil content and ability to grow in rotation with wheat and other cereal crops.
Known in the West as false flax, wild flax, linseed dodder, German sesame and Siberian oil-seed, camelina now is attracting increased scientific interest for its oleaginous qualities, with several European and North American firms poised to produce it in greater commercial quantities for biofuel.
Key words: False flax meal, performance, carcass, lipid oxidation, quail.