false truffle


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Noun1.false truffle - any of various fungi of the family Rhizopogonaceae having subterranean fruiting bodies similar to the truffle
family Rhizopogonaceae, Rhizopogonaceae - a family of fungi of order Hymenogastrales having round subterranean sporophores
Rhizopogon idahoensis - a large whitish Rhizopogon that becomes greyish brown in maturity
Truncocolumella citrina - a fungus with a round yellow to orange fruiting body that is found on the surface of the ground or partially buried; has a distinctive sterile column extending into the spore-bearing tissue
fungus - an organism of the kingdom Fungi lacking chlorophyll and feeding on organic matter; ranging from unicellular or multicellular organisms to spore-bearing syncytia
2.false truffle - any of various fungi of the genus Scleroderma having hard-skinned subterranean fruiting bodies resembling trufflesfalse truffle - any of various fungi of the genus Scleroderma having hard-skinned subterranean fruiting bodies resembling truffles
genus Scleroderma, Scleroderma - genus of poisonous fungi having hard-skinned fruiting bodies: false truffles
Scleroderma aurantium, Scleroderma citrinum - an earthball fungus that is a dingy brownish yellow and a dark purplish interior; the peridium is covered with a pattern of small warts
Scleroderma flavidium, star earthball - an earthball with a smooth upper surface that is at first buried in sand; the top of the fruiting body opens up to form segments like the ray of an umbel
Scleroderma bovista, smooth earthball - an earthball with a peridium that is firm dry and smooth when young but developing cracks when mature; pale orange-yellow when young and reddish brown at maturity
fungus - an organism of the kingdom Fungi lacking chlorophyll and feeding on organic matter; ranging from unicellular or multicellular organisms to spore-bearing syncytia
References in periodicals archive ?
In the past, biologists were unable to confirm any relationship between the false truffle Rhizopogon subcaerulescens and other fungal species.
They theorize that the false truffle rapidly evolved its drastically different shape through changes in a small set of genes important in fungal development.
That's because first-place winner Elizabeth Michele Pine, 17, following in the footsteps of the 18th-century taxonomist, tackled the classification of a group of fungi called false truffles.