false truffle


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Noun1.false truffle - any of various fungi of the family Rhizopogonaceae having subterranean fruiting bodies similar to the truffle
family Rhizopogonaceae, Rhizopogonaceae - a family of fungi of order Hymenogastrales having round subterranean sporophores
Rhizopogon idahoensis - a large whitish Rhizopogon that becomes greyish brown in maturity
Truncocolumella citrina - a fungus with a round yellow to orange fruiting body that is found on the surface of the ground or partially buried; has a distinctive sterile column extending into the spore-bearing tissue
fungus - an organism of the kingdom Fungi lacking chlorophyll and feeding on organic matter; ranging from unicellular or multicellular organisms to spore-bearing syncytia
2.false truffle - any of various fungi of the genus Scleroderma having hard-skinned subterranean fruiting bodies resembling trufflesfalse truffle - any of various fungi of the genus Scleroderma having hard-skinned subterranean fruiting bodies resembling truffles
genus Scleroderma, Scleroderma - genus of poisonous fungi having hard-skinned fruiting bodies: false truffles
Scleroderma aurantium, Scleroderma citrinum - an earthball fungus that is a dingy brownish yellow and a dark purplish interior; the peridium is covered with a pattern of small warts
Scleroderma flavidium, star earthball - an earthball with a smooth upper surface that is at first buried in sand; the top of the fruiting body opens up to form segments like the ray of an umbel
Scleroderma bovista, smooth earthball - an earthball with a peridium that is firm dry and smooth when young but developing cracks when mature; pale orange-yellow when young and reddish brown at maturity
fungus - an organism of the kingdom Fungi lacking chlorophyll and feeding on organic matter; ranging from unicellular or multicellular organisms to spore-bearing syncytia
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
By examining DNA, Palmer and his colleagues discovered a close genetic similarity between the umbrella-shaped Suillus mushroom and a ball-like, soil-living "false truffle" -- one of the first and perhaps most extreme cases in which scientists have found an organism to have evolved directly from another, very different-looking organism, Palmer says.
In the past, biologists were unable to confirm any relationship between the false truffle Rhizopogon subcaerulescens and other fungal species.
That's because first-place winner Elizabeth Michele Pine, 17, following in the footsteps of the 18th-century taxonomist, tackled the classification of a group of fungi called false truffles. Last week, Pine, of Chicago, received a $40,000 college scholarship for this research, part of a $205,000 pot awarded to 40 young scientists.