familistic

familistic

(ˌfæmɪˈlɪstɪk)
adj
(Christian Churches, other) Christianity of or relating to Familists or Familism
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References in periodicals archive ?
The familistic management style which is typical of Japan accurately points to men with high homogeneity working for the same company, spending long hours working towards common goals, and eventually living a pseudo-family existence with each other.
2001, <<The Banquet of Aeolus: A Familistic Interpretation of Italy's Lowest Low Fertility>>, Demographic Research, 4, 5:133-162, disponible sur Internet (http://www.
Italy and Spain: still the case of familistic welfare models?
2009) No differences across groups in acculturation and familistic attitudes; degree of mutuality and communication with mothers was strong predictor of self-harm E.
A characteristic common to various forms of the traditional economy is viewing society and economic organizations within it as families, (6) a view known as familistic groupism.
Yang Kuo-shu' (1995) proposed four emic aspects of Chinese social orientation: familistic, relationship, authoritarian and other orientation, part of which conceptually overlap with Hofstede's Collectivism and Power Distance and Schwartz's Embeddedness and Hierarchy in labeling Chinese culture.
The perspective suggested by Levi revolves around four main concepts: a) the "irrational" and magic mark of a basically primitive religion; b) ancientness, privileging the idea of "relics" or vestige indebted with the nineteenth-century folkloric survivalism (Hodgen, 1936); c) the syncretic character of subaltern religion, combining Catholicism with previous religions; d) the familistic relationship with the divine, based on pragmatic exchanges: "the southerner instituted a custom of making all manner of up-front bargains with saints or the Madonna" (Primeggia 2000, 83).
Childlessness and support networks in later life: New pressures on familistic welfare states?
Over time, these early 'national-socialist' familistic arrangements started to become eroded by the development of capitalism.
It feels more and more clearly a decisive break in social, political and legal culture of our time: a gap between rhetoric of moral increasingly paternalistic, patriarchal, authoritarian, religious and familistic continually reaffirmed at the institutional level by the flowing of the real life, desires, and cultural contamination of cognitive precarious generation.
In many instances the kind of family a person comes from--contractual, compulsive, or familistic will give us some indication of the quality of services the patient will receive (Sorokin, 1941).
The familistic culture reinforces and is reinforced by a familistic welfare model that delegates family care services for children and the elderly to the family sphere and protects the male breadwinner figure.