familistic

familistic

(ˌfæmɪˈlɪstɪk)
adj
(Christian Churches, other) Christianity of or relating to Familists or Familism
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References in periodicals archive ?
"Childlessness and Support Networks in Later Life: New Pressures on Familistic Welfare States?," Journal of Family Issues 35(3): 331-357.
For this reason, it is fundamental to recognize that families are not homogeneous in resources, stages of the life cycle, cultural forms, and level of interaction with the whole of legislation and social policies, such as the overcoming of the familistic character that permeates the political culture of Brazilian society.
The presidential figures built a structure of power based on patronage stretching down to the village elders and gaining loyalty through familistic, ethnic ties and flows of money from the public treasury.
However, Eurasians employed a polar opposite ethos as follows: descent was patrilineal; God conceptualization was familistic; social philosophy was individualistic, xenophobic; ancestor worship employed cremation; and mode of existence was nomadic.
The familistic management style which is typical of Japan accurately points to men with high homogeneity working for the same company, spending long hours working towards common goals, and eventually living a pseudo-family existence with each other.
Italy and Spain: still the case of familistic welfare models?
Our "individualistic" society would be more descriptively called "familistic" and--as it has worked out in the past century--nationalistic and "classistic." The individual is not a datum, and social policy cannot treat him as such.
It should be noted that both religious and familistic ideologies are themselves produced by other social factors (e.g., historical conditions) that may lead said ideologies to play a key role in forming group solidarity (Verweij, Ester, and Nauta 1997).
A characteristic common to various forms of the traditional economy is viewing society and economic organizations within it as families, (6) a view known as familistic groupism.
Yang Kuo-shu' (1995) proposed four emic aspects of Chinese social orientation: familistic, relationship, authoritarian and other orientation, part of which conceptually overlap with Hofstede's Collectivism and Power Distance and Schwartz's Embeddedness and Hierarchy in labeling Chinese culture.

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