fan worm

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fan worm

n
(Animals) any tube-dwelling polychaete worm of the family Sabellidae, having long tentacles that spread into a fan when the worm emerges from its tube
References in periodicals archive ?
spallanzanii and to compare it to data from Gem Pier in Williams-town, a local area with a known heavy infestation of the fan worms, to give these findings some context.
Sabella spallanzanii (Gmelin 1791), a polychaete annelid known alternatively as the giant European or Mediterranean fan worm, is an invasive marine pest species that was first detected in the Geelong arm of Port Phillip Bay in the late 1980s (Carey and Watson 1992).
This, no doubt, has implications for the sheer volume of water that this fan worm can filter in any given hour.
spallanzanii, and, overall, densities of this fan worm are too small to warrant major concern at present, though the situation is worthy of monitoring into the future.
Interestingly, eyes in serpulids may be homologous to those in sabellids, a separate group of fan worms, but do not appear to be homologous to the cephalic eyes of other annelids, which tend to detect light using r-opsins.
But Bok relishes the way the gill eyes in Christmas tree worms and other fan worms seem so improvised, such odd mixes of features cobbled together.
Bok is exploring fan worms' barely studied vision, possibly the only case of animals growing eyes on their gills.
To human thinking, the top of a tree seems a better place for lookouts, and another kind of fan worm does grow compound eyes there.
The unusual radiolar eyes of fan worms are compelling subjects for improving our understanding of eye evolution, the emergence of new sensory systems and behaviors, and signal processing in distributed visual systems.
When startled, fan worms rapidly withdraw into their fortified tubes in order to safeguard their radioles from grazing predators (Rullier, 1948; Nicol, 1950).
Unlike sabellid fan worms, which often have well-developed segmental and pygidial ocelli (Ermak and Eakin, 1976; Dragesco-Kerneis, 1980), serpulid fan worms appear to be largely devoid of superficially obvious ocelli or eyes posterior to the collar.