fanatic


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fa·nat·ic

 (fə-năt′ĭk)
n.
A person marked or motivated by an extreme, unreasoning enthusiasm, as for a cause.
adj.
Fanatical.

[Latin fānāticus, inspired by orgiastic rites, pertaining to a temple, from fānum, temple; see dhēs- in Indo-European roots.]

fanatic

(fəˈnætɪk)
n
1. a person whose enthusiasm or zeal for something is extreme or beyond normal limits
2. informal a person devoted to a particular hobby or pastime; fan: a jazz fanatic.
adj
a variant of fanatical
[C16: from Latin fānāticus belonging to a temple, hence, inspired by a god, frenzied, from fānum temple]

fa•nat•ic

(fəˈnæt ɪk)

n.
1. a person with an extreme and uncritical enthusiasm or zeal, as in religion or politics; zealot.
adj.
2. fanatical.
[1515–25; < Latin fānāticus pertaining to a temple, derivative of fānum temple]
syn: fanatic, zealot, devotee refer to persons showing more than ordinary enthusiasm or support for a cause, belief, or activity. fanatic and zealot both suggest extreme or excessive devotion. fanatic further implies unbalanced or obsessive behavior: a wild-eyed fanatic. zealot, slightly less unfavorable in implication, implies single-minded partisanship: a tireless zealot for tax reform. devotee is a milder term, suggesting enthusiasm but not to the exclusion of other interests or possible points of view: a devotee of baseball.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.fanatic - a person motivated by irrational enthusiasm (as for a cause)fanatic - a person motivated by irrational enthusiasm (as for a cause); "A fanatic is one who can't change his mind and won't change the subject"--Winston Churchill
enthusiast, partizan, partisan - an ardent and enthusiastic supporter of some person or activity
Adj.1.fanatic - marked by excessive enthusiasm for and intense devotion to a cause or idea; "rabid isolationist"
passionate - having or expressing strong emotions

fanatic

noun extremist, activist, militant, addict, enthusiast, buff (informal), visionary, devotee, bigot, zealot, energumen I am not a religious fanatic but I am a Christian.
Quotations
"A fanatic is one who can't change his mind and won't change the subject" [Winston Churchill]

fanatic

noun
1. One who holds extreme views or advocates extreme measures:
2. One zealously devoted to a religion:
3. A person who is ardently devoted to a particular subject or activity:
Informal: buff, fan, fiend.
Slang: freak, nut.
adjective
Holding especially political views that deviate drastically and fundamentally from conventional or traditional beliefs:
Slang: far-out.
Translations
مُتَعَصِّبمُتَعَصِّب، مُتَحَمِّس
fanatikfanatic
fanatiker
kiihkoilijakiihkomielinenfanaatikkofanaattinenkiihkeä
fanatik
fanatikus
ofstækismaîur, öfgamaîur
熱狂者
광신자
fanatiškaifanatizmas
fanātiķis
fanatikfanatický
fanatisk
ผู้คลั่งไคล้
người cuồng tín

fanatic

[fəˈnætɪk]
A. ADJfanático
B. Nfanático/a m/f

fanatic

[fəˈnætɪk] n
(= enthusiast) → fanatique mf
a football fanatic → un(e) fanatique de football, un(e) fana de qch
(= extremist) → fanatique mf
a religious fanatic → un fanatique religieux

fanatic

nFanatiker(in) m(f)
adj = fanatical

fanatic

[fəˈnætɪk] nfanatico/a

fanatic

(fəˈnӕtik) noun
a person who is (too) enthusiastic about something. a religious fanatic.
faˈnatic(al) adjective
(too) enthusiastic. He is fanatical about physical exercise.
faˈnatically adverb
faˈnaticism (-sizəm) noun
(too) great enthusiasm, especially about religion. Fanaticism is the cause of most religious hatred.

fanatic

مُتَعَصِّب fanatik fanatiker Fanatiker φανατικός fanático kiihkoilija fanatique fanatik fanatico 熱狂者 광신자 fanaticus fanatiker fanatyk fanático фанатик fanatisk ผู้คลั่งไคล้ fanatik người cuồng tín 狂热者

fanatic

, fanatical
a. fanático-a.
References in classic literature ?
A fanatic like Cornelius might very easily have found another fanatic who would give a hundred guilders for his remains.
Nor is the history of fanatics half so striking in respect to the measureless self-deception of the fanatic himself, as his measureless power of deceiving and bedevilling so many others.
"Well, such a woman, who would place the knife of Jacques Clement or of Ravaillac in the hands of a fanatic, would save France."
Strickland had the directness of the fanatic and the ferocity of the apostle.
She was so fascinated that, even before marrying him, she joined a committee that had been organized abroad to work for the restoration of Poland; and further, she visited the confessional of a celebrated Jesuit priest, who made an absolute fanatic of her.
The zeal of the religious fanatic whose altar has been desecrated was triply enhanced by the rage of a woman scorned.
Of Carlyle's numerous later works the most important are 'Past and Present,' in which he contrasts the efficiency of certain strong men of medieval Europe with the restlessness and uncertainty of contemporary democracy and humanitarianism and attacks modern political economy; 'Oliver Cromwell's Letters and Speeches,' which revolutionized the general opinion of Cromwell, revealing him as a true hero or strong man instead of a hypocritical fanatic; and 'The History of Frederick the Great,' an enormous work which occupied Carlyle for fourteen years and involved thorough personal examination of the scenes of Frederick's life and battles.
It is thus, if there is any rule, that we ought to die--neither as victim nor as fanatic, but as the seafarer who can greet with an equal eye the deep that he is entering, and the shore that he must leave.
He knew the adventurer and he knew the fanatic. It was quite probable that Stephen, the adventurer, would hold his tongue, through his mere histrionic pleasure in playing a part, his lust for clinging to his new cosy quarters, his rascal's trust in luck, and his fine fencing.
Moreover, his School Toryism was still strong, and he looked still with some jealousy on the Doctor, as somewhat of a fanatic in the matter of change, and thought it very desirable for the School that he should have some wise person (such as himself) to look sharply after vested School-rights, and see that nothing was done to the injury of the republic without due protest.
Swift," it was said, "hated all fanatics: all fanatics hated Dr.
Armies of troops were put into the field, and the fanatics were herded back at the bayonet point to their tasks in the cities.