fancywork


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fan·cy·work

 (făn′sē-wûrk′)
n.
Decorative needlework, such as embroidery.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

fancywork

(ˈfænsɪˌwɜːk)
n
(Knitting & Sewing) any ornamental needlework, such as embroidery or crochet
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

fan•cy•work

(ˈfæn siˌwɜrk)

n.
ornamental needlework.
[1800–10]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.fancywork - decorative needlework
candlewick - loops of soft yarn are cut to give a tufted pattern
crewelwork - embroidery done with loosely twisted worsted yarn
cross-stitch - embroidery done with pairs of stitches that cross each other
cutwork - embroidery in which the design is outlined in a buttonhole stitch and the intervening material is cut away
drawnwork - ornamental needlework done by drawing threads to form lacelike patterns
fagoting - embroidery in which groups of parallel threads are tied together with fagot stitches
hemstitch - embroidery similar to drawnwork
needlepoint embroidery, needlepoint - embroidery consisting of allover embroidered canvas resembling tapestry
needlecraft, needlework - a creation created or assembled by needle and thread
sampler - a piece of embroidery demonstrating skill with various stitches
smocking - embroidery consisting of ornamental needlework on a garment that is made by gathering the cloth tightly in stitches
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in classic literature ?
Often the mothers brought their fancywork and sat on the shady side of the tent during the lesson.
He could talk about rural economy with the count, fashions with the countess and Natasha, and about albums and fancywork with Sonya.
Woodhouse's kindness, felt his particular claim on her to leave her neat parlour, hung round with fancywork, whenever she could, and win or lose a few sixpences by his fireside.
Mingott's sole pursuit, and she would have scorned to feign an interest in fancywork.
I think I liked the horses and the flowers and the fancywork best.
When I was first married, I used to long for my new clothes to wear out or get torn, so that i might have the pleasure of mending them, for I got heartily sick of doing fancywork and tending my pocket handkerchief."
Everyone that is a resident within Montgomery County is eligible to have entries in Classes/Categories such as: AG Sciences: (Corn, Popcorn, Soybeans, Hay, and Sunflower head), Fruits and Vegetables: (Potatoes, Onions, Turnips, Carrots, Beets, Okra, Tomatoes, Green Beans, Cabbage, Peppers, Egg Plant, Cucumber, Zucchini, Cantaloupes, Gourds, Pumpkin, Apples, Pears, Watermelon, and Squash), Flowers & Plants: (Coxcombs, Marigolds, Mums, Roses, Dahlias, Gladiolas, Zinnias, Petunias, and Houseplants), Canned Goods & Misc.: (Eggs and Canned Vegetables, Fruit, Pickles, Jelly, Jams, Preserves, or Salsa), Fancywork & Sewing: (Crocheting, Embroidery, Quilts, Wall Hanging, Cross Stitching, Pillow, Knitting,
Fundraising, Flirtation and Fancywork: Charity Bazaars in Nineteenth Century Australia.
If nobody but a genteel woman of her era could have done such fancywork, it is also true that only a woman this skilled could have had the expertise necessary to create an art form so brilliantly mimetic of plant matter.
Both artists, who worked as volunteer embroiderers on Judy Chicago's Dinner Party, were influenced by the feminist needlework historian, Rachel Maines as indicated by the text on the poster 'Fancywork: the Archaeology of Lives' which reads, "'Textiles can provide the kind of social, psychological, political and sexual information that is needed for a structured history of women's aesthetic thought.' Rachel Maines."
This article focuses on the Victorian taste for nature crafts, a genre of fancywork consisting of decorative objects composed from natural materials, in particular works in which the natural materials--shells, bark, fish scale flowers, leaves, etc.--are subordinate to a larger pattern or illusionistic depiction.