fanlight

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fan·light

 (făn′līt′)
n.
1. A semicircular or semielliptical window, often with sash bars arranged like the ribs of a fan, usually placed over a door or another window.
2. Chiefly British A transom.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

fanlight

(ˈfænˌlaɪt)
n
1. (Architecture) a semicircular window over a door or window, often having sash bars like the ribs of a fan
2. (Architecture) a small rectangular window over a door. US name: transom
3. (Building) another name for skylight
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

fan•light

(ˈfænˌlaɪt)

n.
a window over a door or another window, esp. one having the form of a semicircle or half an ellipse.
[1835–45]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

fanlight

transom
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.fanlight - a window above a door that is usually hinged to a horizontal crosspiece over the doorfanlight - a window above a door that is usually hinged to a horizontal crosspiece over the door
window - a framework of wood or metal that contains a glass windowpane and is built into a wall or roof to admit light or air
2.fanlight - a window in a roof to admit daylightfanlight - a window in a roof to admit daylight
window - a framework of wood or metal that contains a glass windowpane and is built into a wall or roof to admit light or air
3.fanlight - a semicircular window over a door or window; usually has sash bars like the ribs of a fan
window - a framework of wood or metal that contains a glass windowpane and is built into a wall or roof to admit light or air
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

fanlight

[ˈfænlaɪt] Nmontante m de abanico
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

fanlight

[ˈfænlaɪt] nimposte ffan mail ncourrier m des fans
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

fanlight

[ˈfænˌlaɪt] nlunetta (a ventaglio)
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
The pale moonlight streamed through a shattered fanlight over the door; the air was unwholesome and chilly, like that of a vault.
The night had come; the fanlight over the door shone bright; the two windows of the dining-room where the cloth was being laid, and the three windows of the drawing-room where Maria would be waiting dinner, glowed softlier through yellow blinds.
He found that he was in a grotto, went towards the opening, and through a kind of fanlight saw a blue sea and an azure sky.
Philip noticed in the fanlight a cardboard on which was an announcement that apartments were to let.
Above the other door, which opened on to the landing, there hung a fanlight which could be drawn by a cord when some ventilation became absolutely necessary.
He turned on his second tube and opened for half a minute the fanlight over the door.
One house, however, second from the corner, was still occupied entire; and at the door of this, which wore a great air of wealth and comfort, though it was now plunged in darkness except for the fanlight, Mr.
Presently, a light went up-stairs after her, passing first the fanlight of the door, and afterwards the two staircase windows, on its way up.
His eye fell upon a newly-painted tenement which had been recently converted into something between a shop and a private house, and which a red lamp, projecting over the fanlight of the street door, would have sufficiently announced as the residence of a medical practitioner, even if the word 'Surgery' had not been inscribed in golden characters on a wainscot ground, above the window of what, in times bygone, had been the front parlour.
It is of no colour known in this life and has a corrugated wooden crook for a handle, with a metallic object let into its prow, or beak, resembling a little model of a fanlight over a street door or one of the oval glasses out of a pair of spectacles, which ornamental object has not that tenacious capacity of sticking to its post that might be desired in an article long associated with the British army.
As I approached the house I saw a tall man in a Scotch bonnet with a coat which was buttoned up to his chin waiting outside in the bright semicircle which was thrown from the fanlight. Just as I arrived the door was opened, and we were shown up together to Holmes' room.
Holmes's cold, thin fingers closed round my wrist and led me forward down a long hall, until I dimly saw the murky fanlight over the door.