fantastication

fan·tas·ti·cate

 (făn-tăs′tĭ-kāt′)
tr.v. fan·tas·ti·cat·ed, fan·tas·ti·cat·ing, fan·tas·ti·cates
To make fantastic: "[his] splendidly baroque style adorns and fantasticates his thought" (New York Times).

fan·tas′ti·ca′tion n.

fantastication

(fænˈtæstɪˌkeɪʃən)
n
the act of making fantastic
References in periodicals archive ?
Jared Lobdell's contribution on "Humour, Comedy, the Comic, Comicality, Puns, Wordplay, 'Fantastication', and 'English Humour'" is also a bit unfocused--or perhaps it would be better to say kaleidoscopic.
The first anecdote was dismissed by critics as being too weird, an obvious fantastication, and the second swiftly contradicted in a letter to the editor by an intimate of Carter's: "Angela gave up smoking about 10 years ago.
"What if Transfiguration is Just Part of the Gig?" takes risks even more outrageous than its hefty title in its call for attentiveness to the physical world and change in response: "May the metropolis learn / by grace of a heaven / Lighting the wick of the river." Very few poets could get away with the word that Nightingale coins in the concluding line but he at least comes very close: "The sand / Bears a legend because you learned to see / By fantastication of heart sunlight's surety."
The amorous "fantastication" that Cennini describes can be related to the psychology of desire discussed in Andreas Capellanus's twelfth-century De amore; there, love is defined as an "inborn suffering which results from the sight of, and uncontrolled thinking [immoderata cogitatione] about the beauty of the other sex" (Andreas, 33).