far-fetched


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far-fetched

(fär′fĕcht′)
adj.
Not readily believable because of improbable elements therein: a far-fetched analogy; a far-fetched excuse.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

far-fetched

adj
improbable in nature; unlikely
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

far′-fetched′

or far′fetched′,



adj.
improbable; not naturally pertinent; forced; strained: a far-fetched excuse for being late.
[1575–85]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:

far-fetched

Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

far-fetched

adjective
Conceived or done with no reference to reality or common sense:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations

far-fetched

[ˈfɑːˈfetʃt] ADJ [story, explanation] → inverosímil, poco probable; [idea, scheme] → descabellado
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

far-fetched

[ˌfɑːˈfɛtʃt] adj (explanation) → stiracchiato/a, forzato/a; (idea, scheme, story) → inverosimile
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

far

(faː) adverb
1. indicating distance, progress etc. How far is it from here to his house?
2. at or to a long way away. She went far away/off.
3. very much. She was a far better swimmer than her friend (was).
adjective
1. distant; a long way away. a far country.
2. more distant (usually of two things). He lives on the far side of the lake.
farther, farthestfurtherˈfaraway adjective
1. distant. faraway places.
2. not paying attention; dreamy. She had a faraway look in her eyes.
ˌfar-ˈfetched adjective
very unlikely. a far-fetched story.
as far as
1. to the place or point mentioned. We walked as far as the lake.
2. (also so far as) as great a distance as. He did not walk as far as his friends.
3. (also so far as) to the extent that. As far as I know she is well.
by far
by a large amount. They have by far the largest family in the village.
far and away
by a very great amount. She is far and away the cleverest girl in the class!
far from
1. not only not, but. Far from liking him, I hate him.
2. not at all. He was far from helpful.
so far
1. until now. So far we have been quite successful.
2. up to a certain point. We can get so far but no further without more help.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
This sense of the word is perhaps the most far-fetched.
At last, because I was romantic, I devised an explanation which I acknowledged to be far-fetched, but which was the only one that in any way satisfied me.
It seemed to her, in those first minutes, that she had done a mad thing; that all those arguments which she had used were far-fetched and ridiculous.
Nor were their ornaments like those in use to-day, set off by Tyrian purple, and silk tortured in endless fashions, but the wreathed leaves of the green dock and ivy, wherewith they went as bravely and becomingly decked as our Court dames with all the rare and far-fetched artifices that idle curiosity has taught them.
There is something so far-fetched and so extravagant in the idea of danger to liberty from the militia, that one is at a loss whether to treat it with gravity or with raillery; whether to consider it as a mere trial of skill, like the paradoxes of rhetoricians; as a disingenuous artifice to instil prejudices at any price; or as the serious offspring of political fanaticism.
On which account they apply to the nose, as to the part whence blood may most easily be drawn; but this seems a far-fetched as well as ill-natured supposition.
"That," she remarked, "sounds a little far-fetched - not to say impossible."
Perish the far-fetched scruples which would break the heart of one lovely woman, and scatter to the winds the pin-money of another!
Yet this may be a question having no answer "which is still worth asking," because the investigation shows that we can not argue historically from the dates in Plato; it would be useless therefore to waste time in inventing far-fetched reconcilements of them in order avoid chronological difficulties, such, for example, as the conjecture of C.
That sounds far-fetched; but it isn't so when you think of it.'
When water is near and a weight is missing it is not a very far-fetched supposition that something has been sunk in the water.
He soon manifested his familiarity with the ponderous and imposing machinery of antique physic; in which every remedy contained a multitude of far-fetched and heterogeneous ingredients, as elaborately compounded as if the proposed result had been the Elixir of Life.