fashioned


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fash·ion

 (făsh′ən)
n.
1. The prevailing style or custom, as in dress or behavior: out of fashion.
2. Something, such as a garment, that is in the current mode: a swimsuit that is the latest fashion.
3.
a. Manner or mode; way: Set the table in this fashion. See Synonyms at method.
b. A personal, often idiosyncratic manner: played the violin in his own curious fashion.
4. Kind or variety; sort: people of all fashions.
5. Shape or form; configuration: a garden triangular in fashion.
tr.v. fash·ioned, fash·ion·ing, fash·ions
1. To give shape or form to; make: fashioned a table from a redwood burl.
2. To train or influence into a particular state or character: The teacher fashions her students into fine singers.
3. Archaic To adapt, as to a purpose or an occasion.
4. Obsolete To contrive.
Idiom:
after/in a fashion
In some way or other, especially to a limited extent: She sings after a fashion.

[Middle English facioun, from Old French façon, appearance, manner, from Latin factiō, factiōn-, a making, from factus, past participle of facere, to make, do; see dhē- in Indo-European roots.]

fash′ion·er n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.fashioned - planned and made or fashioned artistically; "beautifully fashioned dresses"
designed, intentional - done or made or performed with purpose and intent; "style...is more than the deliberate and designed creation"- Havelock Ellis; "games designed for all ages"; "well-designed houses"
References in classic literature ?
Her furniture is still in the house, and I bought most of it--for a mere song you might say, because it was all so old- fashioned that the trustees despaired of selling it.
We do not hear that Memnon's statue gave forth its melody at all under the rushing of the mightiest wind, or in response to any other influence divine or human than certain short-lived sunbeams of morning; and we must learn to accommodate ourselves to the discovery that some of those cunningly fashioned instruments called human souls have only a very limited range of music, and will not vibrate in the least under a touch that fills others with tremulous rapture or quivering agony.
Like most old fashioned pulpits, it was a very lofty one, and since a regular stairs to such a height would, by its long angle with the floor, seriously contract the already small area of the chapel, the architect, it seemed, had acted upon the hint of Father Mapple, and finished the pulpit without a stairs, substituting a perpendicular side ladder, like those used in mounting a ship from a boat at sea.