fat body

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fat body

n.
1. A food reserve of fatty tissue in the larval stages of certain insects.
2. A mass of fatty tissue located near the genital glands in some amphibians, including the frogs and toads.

fat body

n
1. (Zoology) a mass of fatty tissue in insects, used as an energy source during hibernation and metamorphosis
2. (Zoology) a similar tissue mass in amphibians and reptiles
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The statement adds that that Saeed lacked "a sense of media and humanitarianism", listing a number of violations, including "confusing between obese patients and owners of fat bodies" and "causing frustration for patients and the dissatisfaction of viewers due to the use of phrases and descriptions that insult Egyptian woman" It also describes her as "inconsistent", explaining that during the investigation session "she sometimes apologised, while at other times she confirms she was not mistaken, which means she is unable to distinguish between the clear media rules and personal opinions, and between advice and insult".
A call to arms for those of us who don't intend to diet despite television doctors telling us our fat bodies are embarrassing.
In addition to breaking down toxins and storing nutrients, honey bee fat bodies produce antioxidants and help to manage the immune system.
Harjunen (2002) affirms that, for fat bodies, the "school is one of the most central places where discipline is learnt" (p.
Centuries ago, fat bodies were indicative of affluence, as rich, diverse diets were a privilege afforded only to the upper classes.
with their big fat bodies full of blood that they have sucked from a poor victim and ferocious mouth parts that anchor to the skin while they feed, they are nasty looking little things.
Often my grandfather would ask me to help deal with these pests, and I would scan the undersides of the cabbage leaves looking for the little green caterpillars, dispatching them by smearing their fat bodies with my thumb.
Females differed significantly in the stomach, small intestine, large intestine, lung, and gonads compared to males; however, liver and fat bodies did not differ between the sexes.
Rather, we see this paper as another contribution to the already vast literature that medicalizes and stigmatizes fat bodies and leads to public health policy that does similarly.
Thus, rather than BMI cut-offs, objective experiences of the "fat body", such as movement constraints, seemed to have a greater influence on the participants' body image perception and to be the main factor differentiating how women lived with their "fat bodies".