fatuous

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Related to fatuities: fatuousness

fat·u·ous

 (făch′o͞o-əs)
adj.
Foolish or silly, especially in a smug or self-satisfied way: "an era of delicious, fatuous optimism shaped by the belief that enough good will on the part of people like ourselves could repair anything" (Shirley Abbott). See Synonyms at foolish.

[From Latin fatuus.]

fat′u·ous·ly adv.
fat′u·ous·ness n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

fatuous

(ˈfætjʊəs)
adj
complacently or inanely foolish
[C17: from Latin fatuus; related to fatiscere to gape]
ˈfatuously adv
ˈfatuousness n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

fat•u•ous

(ˈfætʃ u əs)

adj.
foolish or inane, esp. in an unconscious, complacent manner; silly.
[1625–35; < Latin fatuus silly, foolish; see -ous]
fat′u•ous•ly, adv.
fat′u•ous•ness, n.
syn: See foolish.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.fatuous - devoid of intelligence
foolish - devoid of good sense or judgment; "foolish remarks"; "a foolish decision"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

fatuous

adjective foolish, stupid, silly, dull, absurd, dense, ludicrous, lunatic, mindless, idiotic, vacuous, inane, witless, puerile, moronic, brainless, asinine, weak-minded, dumb-ass (slang) That is not a fatuous argument, it has to be taken seriously.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

fatuous

adjective
Displaying a complete lack of forethought and good sense:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations

fatuous

[ˈfætjʊəs] ADJ [remark] → necio, fatuo; [smile] → tonto
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

fatuous

[ˈfætʃuəs] adj [remark, argument, idea] → stupide
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

fatuous

adjtöricht (geh), → albern
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

fatuous

[ˈfætjʊəs] adjfatuo/a
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
He had left his overcoat with the silk-stockinged footmen (the stockings were one of Beaufort's few fatuities), had dawdled a while in the library hung with Spanish leather and furnished with Buhl and malachite, where a few men were chatting and putting on their dancing-gloves, and had finally joined the line of guests whom Mrs.
While most fatuities probably do road trips when they go on cortege visits, some do take to the air.
In 2007, for example, almost immediately after Mailer's death, Joan Smith noted in The Guardian that "Mailer hated authority, homosexuality, women and almost certainly himself, producing fiction and essays that would be comically bad if they did not display addictions to violence and abusive sex." In a 2009 article in Commentary, Algis Valiunas argued that "Mailer could not shut up about the psychic benefits of wife-killing" (72) and that "even his best works were shot through with adolescent fatuities, while the worst of his words and deeds were stupid and vicious without bottom" (75).
I find it disturbing that a professional practice model is proposed that clearly marginalises fathers from their fatuities.
Often estranged from their natural fatuities and barred from forming legally acknowledged new ones of their own, gay men, Sullivan observed, learned to rely not on the kindness of strangers but the loyalty of friends: "Insofar as friendship was an incalculable strength of homosexuals during the calamity of AIDS, it merely showed, I think, how great a loss is our culture's general underestimation of this central human virtue."
Reimann (Eds.), Queer fatuities and queer politics: Challenging culture and the state (pp.
His Internet experience includes more than 10 years in the technology industry: he cofounded LaunchBox Digital and Rock Creed Ventures while working for Harry Diller's IAG Interactive collection of websites, and he served as a board member of Common Sense Media, an organization dedicated to improving the media lives of children and fatuities.
These measures help reassure fatuities, says a flight attendant for Emirates, another U.A.E.
As for me, I no longer have a stake in Anglicanism and the follies and fatuities of its bishops and clergy need not concern me.
Alas, such healthy historiographical doubt seems nowhere to affect policy outcomes, which, to make them more insulting, are generally couched in Blair-style fatuities like "History teaches us ..." (The only thing history taught Blair is that it is always 1938, always Chamberlain at Munich, forever and ever amen.)
He exposes Gutman's lofty contempt for scholarly ethics: "[Wagner]'s operatic texts and prose works alike are contorted by Gutman beyond recognition, and mixed in with that author's opinions in such a fine mesh that it is difficult, and for the uninitiated hardly possible, to tell where one ends and the other begins." (Gutman has called Parsifal "an allegory of the Aryan's fall and redemption," heedless of the fact that the Third Reich banned stagings of the work from 1939 onwards.) Further, Brener devotes almost a whole chapter to revealing the fatuities of the Freudian Peter Gay, who has contended--on no discernible foundation except his own caprices--that Levi, despite his exceptional solicitude for his rabbi father, somehow exemplified Jewish self-hatred.