fault plane


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fault plane

n. Geology
The plane along which the break or shear of a fault occurs.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

fault

(fɔlt)

n.
1. a defect or imperfection; flaw; failing.
2. responsibility for failure or a wrongful act.
3. an error or mistake.
4. a misdeed or transgression.
5. (in tennis, handball, etc.)
a. a ball that when served does not land in the proper section of an opponent's court.
b. a failure to serve the ball according to the rules, as from within a certain area.
6. a break in the continuity of a body of rock or of a vein, with dislocation along the plane of the fracture (fault plane).
7. Obs. lack; want.
v.i.
8. to commit a fault; blunder; err.
9. Geol. to undergo faulting.
v.t.
10. to accuse of error; criticize.
Idioms:
1. at fault, open to censure; blameworthy.
2. find fault, to complain or be critical.
3. to a fault, to an extreme degree.
[1250–1300; Middle English faute < Anglo-French, Middle French « Latin fallere to be wrong]
syn: fault, foible, weakness, failing, vice refer to human shortcomings or imperfections. fault refers to any ordinary shortcoming; condemnation is not necessarily implied: Of his many faults the greatest is vanity. foible suggests a weak point that is slight and often amusing, manifesting itself in eccentricity rather than in wrongdoing: the foibles of an artist. weakness suggests that a person is unable to control a particular impulse or response, and gives way to it: a weakness for ice cream. failing is particularly applied to humanity at large, suggesting common, often venial, shortcomings: Procrastination is a common failing. vice is the strongest term and designates a habit that is detrimental, immoral, or evil: to succumb to the vice of compulsive gambling.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
class="MsoNormalIt comes as a vibration at the surface of the earth resulting from underground movement along a fault plane of a volcanic activity.
Over a few dozen meters on both sides of the fault plane, chalk deposits are highly fractured and display a swarm of calcite veins.
After the earthquake, the slip of the fault plane generates the seismic waves which are recorded by the stations.
The normal fault plane is filled with uncharacterized clastic material which also stains part of the hanging wall.
Generally, the fault is assumed to be planar, and it is presumed that rupture on the fault plane (plane of weakness or interface) is controlled by friction.
The structural trap is a three way dip closure against a north-south normal fault plane at 1,426 mMD (-954m TVDSS) and covering a surface area of 12 sq.km.
At the unstable twinning (UT) configuration, the high density area adjacent to Mg atom on the near fault plane (L8) becomes smaller and the charge redistribution is most serious.
The fault plane divides the soil in two blocks of equal size (Fig.
The spring is stuck on a broad, rough surface which we call a fault plane," Stark said.
If faulted, the attitude of the fault plane may be steep in a normal or reverse fault configuration, or shallow as in a thrust.