faultfinder


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fault·find·er

 (fôlt′fīn′dər)
n.
One who is given to petty criticism and constant complaint.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

fault•find•er

(ˈfɔltˌfaɪn dər)

n.
a person who habitually finds fault or criticizes, esp. in a petty way.
[1555–65]
fault′find`ing, n., adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.faultfinder - someone who is critical of the motives of others
disagreeable person, unpleasant person - a person who is not pleasant or agreeable
depreciator, detractor, disparager, knocker - one who disparages or belittles the worth of something
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

faultfinder

noun
1. A person who finds fault, often severely and willfully:
2. A person who habitually complains or grumbles:
Informal: crank, griper, grouser.
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Phivolcs has created a FaultFinder website for residents to check the faults closest to their location.
To make the active fault maps easily accessible to everyone, Phivolcs created the web-based application, FaultFinder.
Fixer, enabler, rescuer, nagger, faultfinder, and micromanager, just to name a few.
With the rainy season in, the resident "faultfinder" of the Department of Science and Technology's (DOST) stressed the need for the country to be knowledgeable of the right hazard information.
Prohibitive voice as a form of personal initiative may lead to positive consequences (such as greater visibility at work) or negative consequences (such as being misinterpreted as a faultfinder; Liang et al., 2012).
The main role of this thought is that this phenomenon makes the group leaders to attempt to keep the certain level of conflict and protect the conflict in a level which can remain the group lively, dynamic, creative, and faultfinder to itself."
"It is one thing to be a critic but it is totally another thing to be a faultfinder," Ivanov said.
Jesus was a Jew, not an alien intruder in first-century Palestine; a reformer of Jewish beliefs, not an indiscriminate faultfinder of them.
She claimed home owner Clive Nadin called her a "troublemaker and faultfinder" and told her he was not going to do anything about her concerns.
word always had overtones of "censurer, faultfinder" (Online Etymology Dictionary, Nov.
Stengel, who once publicly criticized Werber in front of his teammates, is characterized as a "faultfinder and a crabby old bore" (134).
Every one of the seven perennial sins has its "offspring." Thus, the chapter on "Pride: the Way Up Is Down" is followed by "The Faultfinder." The chapter "Envy, the Secret Sin" is followed by "The Overzealous Egalitarian, or Leveler." (This is the person whose belief system takes fair-mindedness to extremes and verges on aggressive utopianism.) The chapter on anger is followed by one on violence: "Violence Begets More Violence." "Avarice, the Gleaming Deception" is paired with "The Workaholic." Lust is studied not just in its ancient guise but as a contemporary, and commonplace, occurrence.