faun


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faun

a woodland deity
Not to be confused with:
fawn – a young deer; to court favor
Abused, Confused, & Misused Words by Mary Embree Copyright © 2007, 2013 by Mary Embree

faun

 (fôn)
n. Roman Mythology
Any of numerous rural deities represented as having the body of a man and the horns, ears, tail, and sometimes legs of a goat.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Latin Faunus, Faunus.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

faun

(fɔːn)
n
(Classical Myth & Legend) (in Roman legend) a rural deity represented as a man with a goat's ears, horns, tail, and hind legs
[C14: back formation from Faunes (plural), from Latin Faunus]
ˈfaunˌlike adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

faun

(fɔn)

n.
any of a class of ancient Roman deities of the countryside, identified with the satyrs of Greek myth.
[1325–75; Middle English (< Old French faune) < Latin faunus; compare Faunus]
faun′like`, adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.faun - ancient Italian deity in human shape, with horns, pointed ears and a goat's tailfaun - ancient Italian deity in human shape, with horns, pointed ears and a goat's tail; equivalent to Greek satyr
Roman deity - a deity worshipped by the ancient Romans
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
faun
faun
faun
fáni, skógarpúki
faunas
fauns
faun
orman ve kır ilâhı

faun

[fɔːn] Nfauno m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

faun

[ˈfɔːn] nfaune m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

faun

n (Myth) → Faun m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

faun

(foːn) noun
an imaginary creature, half man and half goat.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
It shares whatever error there is in its perspective with that of Hawthorne, whose 'Marble Faun' was a new book at the same time that 'Adam Bede' was new, and whose books now came into my life and gave it their tinge.
He seemed to partake of those obscure forces of nature which the Greeks personified in shapes part human and part beast, the satyr and the faun. I thought of Marsyas, whom the god flayed because he had dared to rival him in song.
This I waded, and went up the opposite side of the valley, past a number of sleeping houses, and by a statue--a Faun, or some such figure, MINUS the head.
He danced like a faun; he introduced manner and style and atmosphere; his words came trippingly upon his tongue, and--he waltzed twice in succession with the paper- box girl that Dempsey Donovan brought.
If you dined with the Lovell Mingotts you got canvas-back and terrapin and vintage wines; at Adeline Archer's you could talk about Alpine scenery and "The Marble Faun"; and luckily the Archer Madeira had gone round the Cape.
Let the reader picture to himself a series of visages presenting successively all geometrical forms, from the triangle to the trapezium, from the cone to the polyhedron; all human expressions, from wrath to lewdness; all ages, from the wrinkles of the new-born babe to the wrinkles of the aged and dying; all religious phantasmagories, from Faun to Beelzebub; all animal profiles, from the maw to the beak, from the jowl to the muzzle.
Have we not seen, or by relation heard, In courts and regal chambers how thou lurk'st, In wood or grove, by mossy fountain-side, In valley or green meadow, to waylay Some beauty rare, Calisto, Clymene, Daphne, or Semele, Antiopa, Or Amymone, Syrinx, many more Too long--then lay'st thy scapes on names adored, Apollo, Neptune, Jupiter, or Pan, Satyr, or Faun, or Silvan?
There was a thing--something about a faun in French--which Helen went into ecstasies over, but I thought it most tinkling and superficial, and said so, and I held to my opinion too."
"Yes," he continued, "I am less to you than your ivory Hermes or your silver Faun. You will like them always.
Not infrequently he is confounded with the faun, a later and decenter creation of the Romans, who was less like a man and more like a goat.
Neither fairies nor fauns, dryads nor nymphs of the forest pools, have really passed away from the world.
But here in her direst need Una found new friends in a troupe of fauns and satyrs who were playing in the forest.