fearsome

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fear·some

 (fîr′səm)
adj.
1. Causing or capable of causing fear: "The Devil is a fearsome enemy" (Jimmy Breslin).
2. Fearful; timid.

fear′some·ly adv.
fear′some·ness n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

fearsome

(ˈfɪəsəm)
adj
1. frightening
2. timorous; afraid
ˈfearsomely adv
ˈfearsomeness n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

fear•some

(ˈfɪər səm)

adj.
1. causing fear.
2. afraid; timid: a tiny, fearsome mouse.
3. inspiring awe or respect: a fearsome intelligence.
[1760–70]
fear′some•ly, adv.
fear′some•ness, n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.fearsome - causing fear or dread or terrorfearsome - causing fear or dread or terror; "the awful war"; "an awful risk"; "dire news"; "a career or vengeance so direful that London was shocked"; "the dread presence of the headmaster"; "polio is no longer the dreaded disease it once was"; "a dreadful storm"; "a fearful howling"; "horrendous explosions shook the city"; "a terrible curse"
alarming - frightening because of an awareness of danger
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

fearsome

Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

fearsome

adjective
2. Filled with fear or terror:
Regional: afeard, ascared.
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
pelottava
zastrašujući

fearsome

[ˈfɪəsəm] ADJ [opponent, reputation, weapon] → temible; [sight] → espantoso; [competition] → encarnizado
he has a fearsome servetiene un saque temible or tremendo
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

fearsome

[ˈfɪərsəm] adj [opponent] → redoutable; [reputation] → redoutable; [sight] → effrayant(e)
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

fearsome

adjfurchterregend; he was in a fearsome rageer hatte einen fürchterlichen Wutanfall
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

fearsome

[ˈfɪəsəm] adj (opponent) → formidabile, terribile; (sight) → terrificante
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
For the fact that it was this said thirty-first cousin, Mr d'Urberville, who had fallen in love with her, a gentleman not altogether local, whose reputation as a reckless gallant and heartbreaker was beginning to spread beyond the immediate boundaries of Trantridge, lent Tess's supposed position, by its fearsomeness, a far higher fascination that it would have exercised if unhazardous.
But as has been said, "No English poet can be put above Coleridge when only quality and not quantity is demanded."* Of The Ancient Mariner I have already told you, although perhaps it is too full of fearsomeness for you to read yet.
Again and again, drinking in the strangeness and the fearsomeness of the world from her lips, I had heard her state that if one offended an Italian, no matter how slightly and unintentionally, he was certain to retaliate by stabbing one in the back.
The principles associated with performing spirits--nobility, danger, fearsomeness, secrecy, mystery--along with many broader Mende social values are all unsettled by frivolous, ribald, self-effacing performance strategies that include calculated disregard for the secrecy of the performer's identity.
If the Nazi regime was ridiculous, those who admired it or were awed by its fearsomeness would also seem foolish for being taken in by sham bravado.
Busari Adelakun's own cognomen, Eruobodo, approximated his reputation for raw courage and fearsomeness. River is never afraid, it is the diver that should fear - that is what Eruobodo means.
[...] The lesser figures, whose masks didn't have the size or the fearsomeness of the chief masquerade, began whipping one another.
A few minutes later, the keeper recounts an exceedingly tall tale of the Knight's courage and fearsomeness to Sancho and the others and promises to tell the King himself of how Quixote had intimidated the lion so much, the ferocious beast verily cowered in his cage.
1548), in agreement with Alberti, provides a relevant comment on the passions represented in paintings: "Painting distinguishes the effects of love; it exposes the falseness of false admiration, the fire of hatred, the palpability of strength, the weariness of effort, the fearsomeness of fear." (11) Likewise Vasari's extended commentary on The Last Judgment refers to the three relevant notions of the imitation of nature, the expression of passions (as well as "expressions," "attitudes," and "thoughts"), and the "terrible force of art" in its marvelous effect on the viewer:
Its fearsomeness may be difficult to conjure, even given associations with satyrs and Satan.