feart

feart

(fɪət; Scottish fiːrt)
adj
afraid
References in periodicals archive ?
No, not caused by the 'Beast from the East' who knew that was what Csaba Laszlo called himself these days but some were downright feart by St Mirren's non-descript win over Brechin last weekend.
Margaret Ellam said: "Fantastic video, hope the roads department at the council were impressed"; and Mary Teresa Beekman-Thomas said: "How I would have loved that when I was young - not now, though; too feart.
This has to examine, as the Nationalists have so far refrained from doing, what stopped people voting for the previous package, what they were feart of, and what were the most flawed and unconvincing details.
Barberger-Gateau P, Lambert J C, Feart C, Peres K, Ritchie K, Dartigues JF, et al.
When I first met her in 1993, drawn by her voice and her reputat ion, she was wary CI wis feart ye might hae a beard
Feart and her associates said (JAMA 2009; 302: 638-48).
A model feart Met police confirmed the attack,saying: "We are keeping an open mind.
Though the work's first reading for voice and piano was heard at the Societe Musicale Independante in 1913, the official public performance was heard in the Salle Erard with mezzo soprano Rose Feart.
The star also said his whole family would be there for his retired church minister dad Sandy to help him through his grief, and he had a message for his mum: "We hope you know we are all here for you, not least because we are feart of the row we would get if we weren't.
Above the commentary, he was heard to say: "You cannae lose son - he's feart fae yi".
Dont be feart of him hen, said Sheila indicating me.