feat


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feat 1

 (fēt)
n.
1. An act or accomplishment of great courage, skill, or imagination; an achievement.
2. Obsolete A specialized skill; a knack.

[Middle English fet, from Anglo-Norman, from Latin factum, from neuter past participle of facere, to make, do; see dhē- in Indo-European roots.]
Synonyms: feat1, achievement, exploit, masterstroke
These nouns denote an extraordinary deed or action: feats of bravery; achievements of diplomacy; military exploits; a masterstroke of entrepreneurship.

feat 2

 (fēt)
adj. feat·er, feat·est Archaic
1. Adroit; dexterous.
2. Neat; trim.

[Middle English fet, suitable, from Old French fait, from Latin factus, done, made; see feature.]

feat′ly adv.

feat

(fiːt)
n
a remarkable, skilful, or daring action; exploit; achievement: feats of strength.
[C14: from Anglo-French fait, from Latin factum deed; see fact]

feat

(fiːt)
adj
1. another word for skilful
2. another word for neat1, suitable
[C14: from Old French fet, from Latin factus made, from facere to make]

feat1

(fit)

n.
a noteworthy or extraordinary act or achievement, usu. displaying boldness, skill, etc.: an athletic feat; a feat of heroism.
[1300–50; Middle English fet, fait < Anglo-French, Old French < Latin factum; see fact]

feat2

(fit)

adj. -er, -est. Archaic.
1. apt; skillful; dexterous.
2. suitable.
3. neat.
[1400–50; late Middle English < Middle French fait made (to fit) < Latin factus, past participle of facere to make, do]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.feat - a notable achievementfeat - a notable achievement; "he performed a great feat"; "the book was her finest effort"
accomplishment, achievement - the action of accomplishing something
derring-do - brave and heroic feats
hit - (baseball) a successful stroke in an athletic contest (especially in baseball); "he came all the way around on Williams' hit"
rally, rallying - the feat of mustering strength for a renewed effort; "he singled to start a rally in the 9th inning"; "he feared the rallying of their troops for a counterattack"
stunt - a difficult or unusual or dangerous feat; usually done to gain attention
tour de force - a masterly or brilliant feat

feat

feat

noun
1. A great or heroic deed:
2. Something completed or attained successfully:
3. A clever, dexterous act:
Translations
مَفْخَرَه، عَمَل بُطولي، مأثَرَه
činvýkonkousek
præstationbedrift
saavutus
sasniegumsvarondarbs
skutok
junaško dejanjemojstrsko dejanje
cesaret ve ustalık isteyen bir iş

feat

[fiːt] Nhazaña f, proeza f

feat

[ˈfiːt] nexploit m, prouesse f
a brilliant feat of engineering (= process) → une formidable prouesse technologique (= thing created) → un chef d'œuvre de technologie

feat

nLeistung f; (heroic, courageous etc) → Heldentat f; (skilful) → Kunststück nt, → Meisterleistung f; a feat of courage/daringeine mutige/wagemutige Tat

feat

[fiːt] nimpresa, prodezza
a feat of engineering → un trionfo dell'ingegneria
that was quite a feat → è stata un'impresa non da poco

feat

(fiːt) noun
an impressive act or achievement. Building the pyramids was a brilliant feat of engineering.
References in classic literature ?
Never a bad word have I for the French, for, though I have ridden twenty times up to their array, I have never yet failed to find some very gentle and worthy knight or squire who was willing to do what he might to enable me to attempt some small feat of arms.
He was also to exhibit 'his astounding feat of throwing seventy-five hundred-weight in rapid succession backhanded over his head, thus forming a fountain of solid iron in mid-air, a feat never before attempted in this or any other country, and which having elicited such rapturous plaudits from enthusiastic throngs it cannot be withdrawn.
This feat of horsemanship again attracted the applause of the multitude.
I used to learn all these feat by heart yonder, down at Pierrefonds, and I have done all that he did except breaking a cord by the corrugation of my temples.
This was the attack for which Ermolov claimed the credit, declaring that only his courage and good luck made such a feat possible: it was the attack in which he was said to have thrown some St.
The feat he had just accomplished seemed little less than miraculous, and I could hardly credit the evidence of my senses when I saw the wide distance that a single daring act had so suddenly placed between us.
cried D'Artagnan, "I know but one man capable of such a feat of strength.
He again held up his foot, which had a gouty appearance owing to its being contained in a dumpy little worsted sock, and I thought he proposed to repeat his first performance, but in this I did him an injustice, for, unlike Porthos, he was one who scorned to do the same feat twice; perhaps, like the conjurors, he knew that the audience were more on the alert the second time.
Now, the beheading of the Sperm Whale is a scientific anatomical feat, upon which experienced whale surgeons very much pride themselves; and not without reason.
A MAN who had traveled in foreign lands boasted very much, on returning to his own country, of the many wonderful and heroic feats he had performed in the different places he had visited.
So we see, in languages, the tongue is more pliant to all expressions and sounds, the joints are more supple, to all feats of activity and motions, in youth than afterwards.
His fame, as usual exaggerating his feats, spread ever more and more widely.