convulsion

(redirected from febrile convulsion)
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Related to febrile convulsion: Febrile seizure

con·vul·sion

 (kən-vŭl′shən)
n.
1. An intense, paroxysmal, involuntary muscular contraction.
2. An uncontrolled fit, as of laughter; a paroxysm.
3. Violent turmoil: "The market convulsions of the last few weeks have shaken the world" (Felix Rohatyn).

convulsion

(kənˈvʌlʃən)
n
1. (Medicine) a violent involuntary contraction of a muscle or muscles
2. a violent upheaval, disturbance, or agitation, esp a social one
3. (usually plural) informal uncontrollable laughter: I was in convulsions.
conˈvulsionary adj

con•vul•sion

(kənˈvʌl ʃən)

n.
1. contortion of the body caused by violent, involuntary muscular contractions.
2. a violent disturbance.
3. an outburst of great, uncontrollable laughter.
[1575–85; < Latin]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.convulsion - a sudden uncontrollable attack; "a paroxysm of giggling"; "a fit of coughing"; "convulsions of laughter"
attack - a sudden occurrence of an uncontrollable condition; "an attack of diarrhea"
2.convulsion - violent uncontrollable contractions of muscles
ictus, raptus, seizure - a sudden occurrence (or recurrence) of a disease; "he suffered an epileptic seizure"
clonus - convulsion characterized by alternating contractions and relaxations
epileptic seizure - convulsions accompanied by impaired consciousness
3.convulsion - a violent disturbanceconvulsion - a violent disturbance; "the convulsions of the stock market"
commotion, hoo-ha, hoo-hah, hurly burly, kerfuffle, to-do, disruption, disturbance, flutter - a disorderly outburst or tumult; "they were amazed by the furious disturbance they had caused"
4.convulsion - a physical disturbance such as an earthquake or upheaval
trouble - an event causing distress or pain; "what is the trouble?"; "heart trouble"

convulsion

noun
1. spasm, fit, shaking, seizure, contraction, tremor, cramp, contortion, paroxysm He fell to the floor in the grip of an epileptic convulsion.
2. upheaval, disturbance, furore, turbulence, agitation, commotion, tumult It was a decade that saw many great social, economic and political convulsions.

convulsion

noun
1. The condition of being physically agitated:
2. A momentous or sweeping change:
3. A condition of anguished struggle and disorder:
paroxysm, throe (used in plural).
Translations
křeč
krampekrampeanfaldkrampetrækning
kohtauskouristusmullistus
grč
háborgásrángató zásrángatózásrengés
rykkir, krampi
katılmasarsılma

convulsion

[kənˈvʌlʃən] N
1. (= fit, seizure) → convulsión f
to have convulsionstener convulsiones
2. (fig) → conmoción f
they were in convulsions [of laughter] → se desternillaban de risa

convulsion

[kənˈvʌlʃən] n (MEDICINE) (= fit) → convulsion f

convulsion

n
(Med) → Schüttelkrampf m no pl, → Konvulsion f (spec); (of crying) → Weinkrampf m no pl
(caused by social upheaval etc) → Erschütterung f
(inf, of laughter) to go into/be in convulsionssich biegen or schütteln vor Lachen; he had the audience in convulsionser rief beim Publikum wahre Lachstürme hervor

convulsion

[kənˈvʌlʃn] n (fit, seizure) → convulsione f
in convulsions (fam) (laughter) → piegato/a in due (dalle risate)

convulse

(kənˈvals) verb
to shake violently. convulsed with laughter.
conˈvulsive (-siv) adjective
conˈvulsively adverb
conˈvulsion (-ʃən) noun
(often in plural) a sudden stiffening or jerking of the muscles of the body.

con·vul·sion

n. convulsión, contracción involuntaria de un músculo;
febrile ______ febril;
Jacksonian ______ Jacksoniana;
tonic-clonic ______ tonicoclónica.

convulsion

n convulsión f, ataque m (fam)
References in periodicals archive ?
Febrile convulsion is one of the major causes of admission in paediatric ward that occurs in between 6 months and 60 months aged children.
Effects of sociodemographic factors on febrile convulsion prevalence.
Bidabadi et al mentioned that iron deficiency anemia was less frequent among the cases with febrile convulsion, as compared to the controls but the difference was not statistically significant.
At least some leave thankful "A child will always be taken to hospital if they have a febrile convulsion."
"He'd had a febrile convulsion when he was a few months old so although I was shaking with fear, I thought I knew what I was dealing with."
Pediatric brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examinations conducted between September 2012 and February 2015 were screened and 83 patients with epilepsy, 49 patients with febrile convulsion, and 74 control patients were included in this retrospective study.
The children with normal neuroimaging findings had cerebral palsy (3), febrile convulsion (14), idiopathic epilepsy (38), and meningoencephalitis (18).
Case-control study of the relationship between anemia and febrile convulsion in children between 9 months and 5 years of age.
"Almost seconds later, other bystanders kindly donated a couple of blankets and offered help, "Then a doctor came to our aid who immediately diagnosed George as having a febrile convulsion due to a spike in his body temperature, and that he was just coming around from the fit."
The clinical data (age, duration of epilepsy, febrile convulsion history, and response to AEDs) were compared with qMR findings.
Results: NCX currents were decreased in rats after febrile convulsion. Compared to the control group, NCX3 expression was decreased by about 40% and 50% in the hippocampus and cerebrocortex of convulsion-prone rats, respectively.
While one of the patients with seizures had electroencephalography abnormality, the other was considered as simple febrile convulsion. In another study, Gedalia and Zamir (8) reported neurologic manifestations in 13 of 101 children with FMF.