fed


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Fed

 (fĕd)
n. Informal
1. The Federal Reserve.
2. often fed A federal agent or official.

fed

 (fĕd)
v.
Past tense and past participle of feed.

fed

(fɛd)
vb
1. the past tense and past participle of feed
2. fed to death fed to the teeth fed up to the teeth fed to the back teeth fed up to the back teeth informal bored or annoyed

fed

(fɛd)
n
(Law) slang US an agent of the FBI

Fed

(fɛd)
n
(Banking & Finance) the Fed informal US the Federal Reserve Bank or Federal Reserve Board

fed1

(fɛd)

v.
pt. and pp. of feed.
Idioms:
fed up, impatient.

fed2

(fɛd)

n.
(often cap.) Informal. a federal official or law-enforcement officer.
[1915–20; by shortening]

Fed

(fɛd)

n. the Fed, Informal.
1. the Federal Reserve System.
2. the Federal Reserve Board.

Fed.

Federal.

fed.

1. federal.
2. federated.
3. federation.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.fed - any federal law-enforcement officerFed - any federal law-enforcement officer
federal agent, agent - any agent or representative of a federal agency or bureau
2.fed - the central bank of the United StatesFed - the central bank of the United States; incorporates 12 Federal Reserve branch banks and all national banks and state-chartered commercial banks and some trust companies; "the Fed seeks to control the United States economy by raising and lowering short-term interest rates and the money supply"
central bank - a government monetary authority that issues currency and regulates the supply of credit and holds the reserves of other banks and sells new issues of securities for the government
Federal Reserve Bank, reserve bank - one of 12 regional banks that monitor and act as depositories for banks in their region
national bank - a commercial bank chartered by the federal government
member bank - a bank that is a member of the Federal Reserve System
Translations

Fed

[fed]
A. N ABBR
1. (US) =federal officerfederal mf
2. (US) (Banking) =Federal Reserve Board
B. ABBR (esp US) =federal, federated, federation

fed

2
n (US inf) → FBI-Agent(in) m(f)

feed

(fiːd) past tense, past participle fed (fed) verb
1. to give food to. He fed the child with a spoon.
2. (with on) to eat. Cows feed on grass.
noun
food especially for a baby or animals. Have you given the baby his feed?; cattle feed.
fed up
tired; bored and annoyed. I'm fed up with all this work!

fed

a. pp. de to feed;
to be ___ upestar harto-a, pop. estar hasta la coronilla.

fed

pret & pp de feed
References in classic literature ?
The girls meantime spread the table, set the children round the fire, and fed them like so many hungry birds, laughing, talking, and trying to understand the funny broken English.
He received no salary but was fed at the hotel table and bore with pride the title of "night clerk.
They kept him in their hole and fed him for the same reason that the prairie-dogs and the brown owls house the rattlesnakes-- because they did not know how to get rid of him.
A graceful cradle of willow, with all its dainty furbishings, was laid upon the pyre, which had already been fed with the richness of a priceless layette.
He was seated on a pile of brush, a few twigs from which occasionally fed his low fire, with his head leaning on his arm, in a posture of melancholy musing.
A, lady--who had fed herself from childhood with the shadowy food of aristocratic reminiscences, and whose religion it was that a lady's hand soils itself irremediably by doing aught for bread,--this born lady, after sixty years of narrowing means, is fain to step down from her pedestal of imaginary rank.
Except for that small expenditure in the decoration of her infant, Hester bestowed all her superfluous means in charity, on wretches less miserable than herself, and who not unfrequently insulted the hand that fed them.
Here be it said that in a whaling voyage the first fire in the try-works has to be fed for a time with wood.
We were taken to a light, airy stable, and placed in boxes adjoining each other, where we were rubbed down and fed.
There were cattle which had been fed on "whisky-malt," the refuse of the breweries, and had become what the men called "steerly"-- which means covered with boils.
There is some sense in it, in your case; they have brought you up like a child, fed you, clothed you, indulged you, and taught you, so that you have a good education; that is some reason why they should claim you.
The very cows are driven to their country pastures before the end of May; though I have heard of one unnatural farmer who kept his cow in the barn and fed her on hay all the year round.