felony

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Related to felonies: Convicted felon

fel·o·ny

 (fĕl′ə-nē)
n. pl. fel·o·nies Law
1. One of several serious crimes, such as murder, rape, or robbery, punishable by a more stringent sentence than that given for a misdemeanor.
2. Any of several crimes in early English law that were punishable by forfeiture of land or goods and by capital or other serious punishment.

felony

(ˈfɛlənɪ)
n, pl -nies
(Law) (formerly) a serious crime, such as murder or arson. All distinctions between felony and misdemeanour were abolished in England and Wales in 1967

fel•o•ny

(ˈfɛl ə ni)

n., pl. -nies.
1. an offense of graver character than a misdemeanor and usu. punished by imprisonment for more than one year.
2. Early Eng. Law. any crime punishable by death or mutilation and forfeiture of goods.
[1250–1300; Middle English < Anglo-French, Old French]

felony

A serious crime, such as murder or rape. Compare misdemeanor.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.felony - a serious crime (such as murder or arson)
crime, criminal offence, criminal offense, law-breaking, offense, offence - (criminal law) an act punishable by law; usually considered an evil act; "a long record of crimes"
seizure, capture - the act of taking of a person by force
racketeering - engaging in a racket
bribery, graft - the practice of offering something (usually money) in order to gain an illicit advantage
larceny, stealing, theft, thievery, thieving - the act of taking something from someone unlawfully; "the thieving is awful at Kennedy International"
extortion - the felonious act of extorting money (as by threats of violence)
burglary - entering a building unlawfully with intent to commit a felony or to steal valuable property

felony

noun crime, offence, misdemeanour, transgression, job (informal), wrong, fault, outrage, atrocity, violation, trespass, misdeed, unlawful act, malfeasance He pleaded guilty to six felonies.

felony

noun
Law. A serious breaking of the public law:
Translations
جِنايَه، جَريمَه كُبْرى
težký zločin
forbrydelse
fõbenjáró bûn
glæpur
ağır suç

felony

[ˈfelənɪ] N (Jur) → crimen m, delito m grave

felony

[ˈfɛləni] ncrime m, forfait m

felony

n(schweres) Verbrechen

felony

[ˈfɛlənɪ] n (Law) → reato, crimine m

felon

(ˈfelən) noun
a person who is guilty of a serious crime.
ˈfelonyplural ˈfelonies noun
a serious crime. He committed a felony.
References in classic literature ?
THE SECOND class of powers, lodged in the general government, consists of those which regulate the intercourse with foreign nations, to wit: to make treaties; to send and receive ambassadors, other public ministers, and consuls; to define and punish piracies and felonies committed on the high seas, and offenses against the law of nations; to regulate foreign commerce, including a power to prohibit, after the year 1808, the importation of slaves, and to lay an intermediate duty of ten dollars per head, as a discouragement to such importations.
The power to define and punish piracies and felonies committed on the high seas, and offenses against the law of nations, belongs with equal propriety to the general government, and is a still greater improvement on the articles of Confederation.
'Yet, if you'll read his letter, you'll find he is the tenderest of men to prisoners convicted of the whole calendar of felonies,' said I; 'though I can't find that his tenderness extends to any other class of created beings.'
Illinois has a lengthy and controversial history with its rule that allows prosecutors to charge accomplices in certain felonies with the murder of anyone who dies during the commission of those crimes.
A person convicted of Class X felonies can be sentenced to up to 30 years in prison.
In 2018, Beshears office led the prosecution of Ray in separate but related cases where a jury convicted Ray on two counts of first-degree sexual abuse against children under the age of 12, Class C felonies, for crimes that occurred in 2015.
Darren Jacob Surratt, 35, of Mooresville, N.C., was arrested and charged with insurance fraud and obtaining property by false pretense, both felonies, according to a March 8 statement from the North Carolina Department of Insurance.
Felonies more than 10 years old and misdemeanors more than three years old do not count.
Thompson acknowledged that Ellison has 58 arrests, including a few felonies, but none involved violence.
State Question 780 reclassified simple drug possession and many minor property crimes as misdemeanors rather than felonies. No longer would individuals convicted of these offenses be facing long prison sentences and felony records.
A meeting of Taiwan's Cabinet on Thursday passed a criminal law amendment bill that aims to address certain issues, the most notable of which is to seek the elimination of the 30-year statutory time limit on prosecution of certain felonies.
While Arizonas criminal code is routinely used to charge people with felonies, there are felony penalties sprinkled throughout state statutes.