felony


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fel·o·ny

 (fĕl′ə-nē)
n. pl. fel·o·nies Law
1. One of several serious crimes, such as murder, rape, or robbery, punishable by a more stringent sentence than that given for a misdemeanor.
2. Any of several crimes in early English law that were punishable by forfeiture of land or goods and by capital or other serious punishment.

felony

(ˈfɛlənɪ)
n, pl -nies
(Law) (formerly) a serious crime, such as murder or arson. All distinctions between felony and misdemeanour were abolished in England and Wales in 1967

fel•o•ny

(ˈfɛl ə ni)

n., pl. -nies.
1. an offense of graver character than a misdemeanor and usu. punished by imprisonment for more than one year.
2. Early Eng. Law. any crime punishable by death or mutilation and forfeiture of goods.
[1250–1300; Middle English < Anglo-French, Old French]

felony

A serious crime, such as murder or rape. Compare misdemeanor.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.felony - a serious crime (such as murder or arson)
crime, criminal offence, criminal offense, law-breaking, offense, offence - (criminal law) an act punishable by law; usually considered an evil act; "a long record of crimes"
seizure, capture - the act of taking of a person by force
racketeering - engaging in a racket
bribery, graft - the practice of offering something (usually money) in order to gain an illicit advantage
larceny, stealing, theft, thievery, thieving - the act of taking something from someone unlawfully; "the thieving is awful at Kennedy International"
extortion - the felonious act of extorting money (as by threats of violence)
burglary - entering a building unlawfully with intent to commit a felony or to steal valuable property

felony

noun crime, offence, misdemeanour, transgression, job (informal), wrong, fault, outrage, atrocity, violation, trespass, misdeed, unlawful act, malfeasance He pleaded guilty to six felonies.

felony

noun
Law. A serious breaking of the public law:
Translations
جِنايَه، جَريمَه كُبْرى
težký zločin
forbrydelse
fõbenjáró bûn
glæpur
ağır suç

felony

[ˈfelənɪ] N (Jur) → crimen m, delito m grave

felony

[ˈfɛləni] ncrime m, forfait m

felony

n(schweres) Verbrechen

felony

[ˈfɛlənɪ] n (Law) → reato, crimine m

felon

(ˈfelən) noun
a person who is guilty of a serious crime.
ˈfelonyplural ˈfelonies noun
a serious crime. He committed a felony.
References in classic literature ?
I'd inform if he were my own son: and it's felony without benefit of clergy
Do you know,' said I, as we walked along the passage, 'what felony was Number Twenty Seven's last "folly"?
Jaggers made not me alone intensely melancholy, because, after he was gone, Herbert said of himself, with his eyes fixed on the fire, that he thought he must have committed a felony and forgotten the details of it, he felt so dejected and guilty.
Take thy life, but with this condition, that in three days thou shalt leave England, and go to hide thine infamy in thy Norman castle, and that thou wilt never mention the name of John of Anjou as connected with thy felony.
A monster petition praying that the holding back from the laborer of any portion of the net value produced by his labor be declared a felony.
Felony is a term of loose signification, even in the common law of England; and of various import in the statute law of that kingdom.
Gentlemen,' said the president, when silence was restored, `is the Count of Morcerf convicted of felony, treason, and conduct unbecoming a member of this House?
They shall in all Cases, except Treason, Felony and Breach of the Peace, be privileged from Arrest during their Attendance at the Session of their respective Houses, and in going to and returning from the same; and for any Speech or Debate in either House, they shall not be questioned in any other Place.
He's not got blood enough to go in for felony with impunity.
I guess we are aiding and abetting a felony, Watson.
But, in any case a forced marriage is no marriage, but it is a very serious felony, as you will discover before you have finished.
To men who only aim at escaping felony, nothing short of the prisoner's dock is disgrace.